[Market-farming] Squash bug control

Bill Bradshaw billbradshaw at hughes.net
Sat Oct 31 15:09:56 EDT 2009


Ben, I hear Ya Man. Not only that, but the bugs are already there. They have 
just been run through the bird. Bill In Texas


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Wiener, Benjamin L CPT NG NG FORSCOM" <benjamin.l.wiener at us.army.mil>
To: "Market Farming" <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Cc: "Market Farming" <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Saturday, October 31, 2009 12:38 PM
Subject: Re: [Market-farming] Squash bug control


> One of the reasons I will never be certified organic is the sheer 
> stupidity of some of the rules.  If guinea fowl cannot be used because of 
> the tiny ammount of droppings they would leave, then what do organic 
> growers do to exclude wild birds that already deposit droppings in the 
> field?  There is a huge difference in quantity between applying manure for 
> fertility and using a natural method of bug control.  You can't even use 
> manure from animals that recieve adequate veterinary care.  What a bunch 
> of BS (pun intended).
>
> Ben Wiener
>
>> (Guinea fowl actually probably wouldn't meet current organic
>> standards:
>> they'd be depositing fresh manure in the field, and to do the job
>> they'd probably have to be in there within the 120 days before
>> harvest
>> -- fresh manure can't be applied within 120 days of harvest of a
>> crop
>> for human consumption if the part of the plant for consumption can
>> touch the ground. You could put them in the field after harvest to
>> clean up, of course; that might reduce next year's pest pressure
>> significantly.)
>>
>> -- Rivka; Finger Lakes NY, Zone 5 mostly
>> Fresh-market organic produce, small scale
>>
>>
>> On Oct 31, 2009, at 9:27 AM, Diane Kunkel wrote:
>>
>>
>> <Hi, Do any of you use Guinea Fowl for squash bug control?
>> I've almost
>>
>> given up on squash & pumpkins. Or are there any organic controls for
>>
>> these little devils? Thanks,  Andy   zone 5-6  Wenatchee, WA
>>
>>
>> <
>>
>> I've found a lot of varietal difference in susceptibility to squash
>> bugs -- in particular, I've found buttercups and kabocha types (of
>> various varieties) to be much more susceptible to them than acorn,
>> delicata/sweet dumpling, and butternut types. I haven't researched
>> other organic controls -- I think there are some -- because I rarely
>> have significant problems with the resistant types.
>>
>>
>> On the other hand, I've never had much problem with squash bugs in
>> pumpkins; so it's possible our squash bugs don't have the same tastes
>> as yours.
>>
>>
>> (Guinea fowl actually probably wouldn't meet current organic
>> standards: they'd be depositing fresh manure in the field, and to do
>> the job they'd probably have to be in there within the 120 days before
>> harvest -- fresh manure can't be applied within 120 days of harvest of
>> a crop for human consumption if the part of the plant for consumption
>> can touch the ground. You could put them in the field after harvest to
>> clean up, of course; that might reduce next year's pest pressure
>> significantly.)
>>
>>
>> <-- Rivka; Finger Lakes NY, Zone 5 mostly
>>
>> Fresh-market organic produce, small scale<
>> _______________________________________________
>> Market-farming mailing list
>> Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Market-farming mailing list
> Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming
> 




More information about the Market-farming mailing list