[Market-farming] Market-farming Digest, Vol 73, Issue 21

Pete Vukovich pvukovic1 at yahoo.com
Fri Feb 20 13:47:09 EST 2009


Maybe you could hire a bug for the quackgrass. Or try the glyphosphate idea, and plant with red clover afterwords. This is interesting, I'll poke around if I get more time.

http://www.cogongrass.org/control.cfm

http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ent/biocontrol/weedfeeders/wdfdrintro.html




--- On Thu, 2/19/09, market-farming-request at lists.ibiblio.org <market-farming-request at lists.ibiblio.org> wrote:
From: market-farming-request at lists.ibiblio.org <market-farming-request at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: Market-farming Digest, Vol 73, Issue 21
To: market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
Date: Thursday, February 19, 2009, 10:21 AM

Send Market-farming mailing list submissions to
	market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
	http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
	market-farming-request at lists.ibiblio.org

You can reach the person managing the list at
	market-farming-owner at lists.ibiblio.org

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of Market-farming digest..."


Today's Topics:

   1. Minnesota Sustainable Farming Association	Conference Full
      (Jerry and Marienne)
   2. Setting up a Propagation Mat (Allan Balliett)
   3. Re: Peppers in High Tunnels (Pat Meadows)
   4. Re: Quack Grass (Pat Meadows)
   5. Re: potato seed, source & disease (Pat Meadows)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2009 13:22:02 -0600
From: Jerry and Marienne <kreitlow at cmgate.com>
Subject: [Market-farming] Minnesota Sustainable Farming Association
	Conference Full
To: market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
Message-ID: <F5D0530B-83FC-4852-8779-A184CD9749EA at cmgate.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

In case any of you were planning to come to the Sustainable Farming  
Association of Minnesota Conference on Saturday, and you have not pre- 
registered, we are full and have closed registration.  I apologize if  
you were planning to register onsite, but we will not be able to take  
any walk-ups.  It's great for us, but I'm sad for those who didn't 

get in.

All the best,
Jerry Ford
Events & Youth Outreach Coordinator
Sustainable Farming Association of MN
(320) 543-3394
www.sfa-mn.org


-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/market-farming/attachments/20090218/21860789/attachment-0001.htm


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2009 09:19:02 -0500
From: Allan Balliett <aballiett at frontiernet.net>
Subject: [Market-farming] Setting up a Propagation Mat
To: Market Farming <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Message-ID: <p062309cec5c319dc7a27@[192.168.123.183]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ;
format="flowed"

I seem to recall reading that a propagation mat should be sandwiched 
between two foam insulation boards, covered with grounded metal 
window screening and then covered with a sheet of heavy (waterproof) 
plastic

I've got one of those large rubber-like mats that Leonard "used
to" 
sell. I noticed earlier in this year that it seems to be putting out 
spotty heat, so I thought maybe I better put a sheet of insulation 
board on top of it spread out the heat evenly.

Does anyone else set their mat up like this? Do you use the grounded 
screen? After the mat attains heat (I do have an industrial 
thermostat), is there any reason why the insulation boards would be 
'too much' for it?

I'd appreciate hearing your experiences and ideas.

Thanks

-Allan in WV


------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2009 12:35:39 -0500
From: Pat Meadows <pat at meadows.pair.com>
Subject: Re: [Market-farming] Peppers in High Tunnels
To: Market Farming <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Message-ID: <r16rp4d8hjq1dl8vaknc6e8oej7j03nlhe at 4ax.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

On Tue, 17 Feb 2009 11:23:15 -0500, you wrote:


>If fruit is left on the plant and becomes fully red ripe is that a signal
to 
>the plant
>to shut down, mine quit blooming after the reds showed up.? I had expected 
>them to keep going like tomatoes.
>

I think it is.  I'm not 100% positive, but I think so.

Pat
-- 
In Pennsylvania's Northern Tier, northeastern USA.
Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html

What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide
what kind of difference you want to make. - Jane Goodall


------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2009 12:40:38 -0500
From: Pat Meadows <pat at meadows.pair.com>
Subject: Re: [Market-farming] Quack Grass
To: Market Farming <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Message-ID: <u66rp4ho38tqo05gqgjv9vto2ntqh0sh4f at 4ax.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

On Sun, 15 Feb 2009 09:07:18 -0500, you wrote:

>Once a week for the past two months I have been digging quack grass roots
>out of my green house but this weed just keeps coming back. Can anyone tell
>me how to get rid of quack grass.
>

Sigh.  It's not easy.  It is terrible stuff.  We have it too.  It's
part of
the reason (not the whole reason, but a good part of it) why I'm gardening
mostly in Self-Watering Containers now.  

I suppose Roundup would work if I could bring myself to use it.  Our place
is only about 50 feet from a creek and we're uphill from the creek.  I
don't know what Roundup would do to the life in the creek.  I don't
think
it would help it, however.  

Pat
-- 
In Pennsylvania's Northern Tier, northeastern USA.
Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html

What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide
what kind of difference you want to make. - Jane Goodall


------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2009 12:50:18 -0500
From: Pat Meadows <pat at meadows.pair.com>
Subject: Re: [Market-farming] potato seed, source & disease
To: Market Farming <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Message-ID: <ur6rp4dli5pa3sendi5c3jsuhjadv3e42f at 4ax.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

On Sun, 15 Feb 2009 07:52:34 +0200, you wrote:

>We use True Potato Seed (TPS) grown in trays just like tomatoes and then
planted out, the progeny of which is then our seed for the ware crop. There are
limited varieties available however, and it is a two stage process, but if your
process is sterile it produces very clean seed. We us Hygrotech
"Mari"....
>
>By the way, could someone tell us what a CSA is......I guess its some kind
of consumer group...we would like to try something like this in our local city
....sorry, we're new!
>

CSA stands for Community-Supported Agriculture.  

I suppose every CSA is different, it can work however the farmer and
subscribers desire.  But here's a typical setup:

The subscribers buy 'shares' in the farmer's crops for a season or
for a
year.  They pay in advance.  I've seen figures such as $400 USD for a share
these days - that would be for a spring/summer/fall growing season.  Then
the farmer distributes his crops to the members each week or every other
week.  

The members get whatever is in season, as determined by the farmer - they
don't get to pick and choose usually.  

If there's a crop failure, well - then there's a crop failure.  The
farmer
is not obliged to make up the difference or to pay back the money.  The
subscribers are, therefore, assuming some of the risk of farming and
supporting the farm.  

I've been a member only once, because I wanted to try it.  It wasn't
much
use to me because I garden, as it happens - too much duplication.  If I did
not garden, I'd have loved it. 

My daughter, who doesn't garden, is a member of an excellent CSA in her
area:  she *loves* it.  She drives out to the farm each week and picks up
her box of greens, tomatoes, corn - whatever.  

The members need to be a little adventuresome; they often receive
vegetables that they haven't eaten before and need to learn to cook.  This
broadens their horizons which is excellent.

It takes a brave farmer to contract with, say, 100 people to produce a box
of vegetables and/or fruit and/or herbs for each of them every week for six
months.  The farmer needs to schedule, plan, and plant carefully.  Some
CSAs are combined efforts from several farms.  

Often, CSA's have picnics on their farms, or other events, for the
subscribers to get to know the farmer and farm.  Some CSAs require that the
subscribers work a certain amount of hours.  CSA farmers often have email
newsletters to keep the subscribers advised of what veggies they will be
having and what's happening on 'their' farm.

Article on CSA:  

http://www.localharvest.org/csa/

Pat
-- 
In Pennsylvania's Northern Tier, northeastern USA.
Website: www.meadows.pair.com/articleindex.html

What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide
what kind of difference you want to make. - Jane Goodall


------------------------------

_______________________________________________
Market-farming mailing list
Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming

Get the list FAQ at: http://www.marketfarming.net/mflistfaq.htm


End of Market-farming Digest, Vol 73, Issue 21
**********************************************



      
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/market-farming/attachments/20090220/f1083cba/attachment.html 


More information about the Market-farming mailing list