[Market-farming] curing garlic in humidity

courtney mcleod sunmoonriver at windstream.net
Mon Jun 18 08:17:47 EDT 2007


Now I'm in Virginia, and again having the humidity... but this time we don't
have a large enough walk-in to store garlic.  Last summer we kept fans
blowing on the garlic all July and August while it cured out in a big
storage shed.  The garlic kept in good shape... but it dried down more than
usual, and running the fans all summer used a lot of electricity.  (Less
than a walk-in though!)

 

Any advice muchly appreciated!

Thanks

Ken Bezilla

Acorn Community Farm

Mineral, VA

 

 

Hi Ken

I live in northeast Ohio and we always have humidity.for 2 years I dried it
in my greenhouse and then stored in our woodshop which stays pretty cool if
we don't keep the doors open in there.  I did pretty well through March or
so.  Last year I dried it the same way..but left it out there too long and I
think it dried too much.  Was still fine to use, but shriveled up to nothing
too fast over winter for us to use.  I know you are not supposed to dry in
the sun.but it sure worked nice if I could put the 2 years together and make
it work.  I know that some farmers lay it in the fields after they harvest
for a few days, if there is no rain in the forecast.  Which for us up
here.would be very welcome!  We still have had none in I don't know how many
weeks.  It's hit or miss around here and we have been missed.  Feel bad for
the folks in Texas.  Have a great Uncle down in Dallas area.should call and
make sure they are not on a house boat right now!  Anyway, but in the past
for drying, we have hung in our milk house and then stored in basement.
It's hard to find the right place when dealing with humidity, but it does
amazingly well considering that factor around here.

 

Courtney

Herb Thyme

Middlefield, Oh

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/market-farming/attachments/20070618/56689fef/attachment.html 


More information about the Market-farming mailing list