[Market-farming] (no subject)

Home Grown Kansas! hgkansas at sbcglobal.net
Mon Feb 12 15:28:16 EST 2007


I used 1 1/4" plastic pipe to build a 14' x 48' hoop house.   Used a large T-post driver to drive chain link fence posts (heavy gage pipe).  A 45 degree 1 1/4" plastic pipe fitting fit perfectly on to the top of the post - had to cut post with a pipe cutter after driving into the ground - approximately 48" above ground level.  Cut plastic pipe to length, inserted one end into 45 degree fitting on one side of hoop house and then bent pipe over and inserted it into a 45 degree fitting on the other side.   One every 4'.  Framed ends with door, vents and braces.  Connected the ends to one another with a heavy twine to keep frames from spreading in the wind.  You do have to keep the snow from building up on the frames.  Attach film so that sides could be rolled up for venting.  Worked for years until a tree fell on it during an ice storm.  It is being rebuilt at this time - was very productive.  
   
  We use water 55 gal water barrels on the sides and in the center to support benches.  2" Styrofoam with black plastic for a top for growing trays.  Frames filled with growing medium for waist high growing beds.
   
  Highly recommend checking out this web site http://www.passivesolargreenhouse.com/ for another type of greenhouse - that may or may not work for you.  
   
  Good luck.
  Elzie  
  

Beth Spaugh <lists at rhomestead.com> wrote:
      st1\:* {   BEHAVIOR: url(#default#ieooui)  }      @page Section1 {size: 8.5in 11.0in; margin: 1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; }  P.MsoNormal {   FONT-SIZE: 12pt; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; FONT-FAMILY: "Times New Roman"  }  LI.MsoNormal {   FONT-SIZE: 12pt; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; FONT-FAMILY: "Times New Roman"  }  DIV.MsoNormal {   FONT-SIZE: 12pt; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; FONT-FAMILY: "Times New Roman"  }  A:link {   COLOR: blue; TEXT-DECORATION: underline  }  SPAN.MsoHyperlink {   COLOR: blue; TEXT-DECORATION: underline  }  A:visited {   COLOR: purple; TEXT-DECORATION: underline  }  SPAN.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {   COLOR: purple; TEXT-DECORATION: underline  }  SPAN.EmailStyle17 {   COLOR: windowtext; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-style-type: personal-compose  }  DIV.Section1 {   page: Section1  }      Our first hoophouse was/is 14 x 20. A friend bent water pipe - I am not sure how long a pipe but we got 24 foot plastic and had plenty to spare - I assume 20 foot waterpipe. We put the ends in
 depressions drilled in a 2 x 4 frame on the ground. Wired lengths of 2x2 across the top for  ridge pole. Framed in a door with small vent above the door on each end. Still using it, mostly for storage, since we have a 26 x 96 now too. But, DH has been asked to build 3 like our old one for friends. Haven't costed it out. Wants to use Gatorshield pipe. The original waterpipe isn't rated for a heavy snow load. One winter I stuck a couple upright 2 x 4s in as vertical supports when we had several inches of snow.
   
  But, it was not expensive and has served us well. I would prefer more venting on the ends.
   
  Beth Spaugh
Rehoboth Homestead
Peru NY
http://rhomestead.com

   

    
---------------------------------
  From: The Blankleys [mailto:blankley at core.com] 
Sent: Monday, February 12, 2007 12:42 PM
To: Market-Farming at lists.ibiblio.org
Subject: [Market-farming] (no subject)


  
    Regards to the list!
   
  I am planning on making/ buying a smaller sized hoop house and am thinking of a 12 X 24 ‘ size. I have a catalog from Charlie’s Greenhouse out west and Farm Tek to consider. Do any of you have any suggestions on where to buy or what book to use to assemble my own? I would appreciate any comments and thank you in advance. Georgene ( Farmer’s Daughter’s Organics) in Ohio   

_______________________________________________
Market-farming mailing list
Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming


-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/market-farming/attachments/20070212/f010af91/attachment.html 


More information about the Market-farming mailing list