[Market-farming] Coleman: "We no longer dig the garden." / No-till in the organic mainstream

Marty Kraft martyk at allspecies.org
Thu Feb 1 07:18:24 EST 2007


I guess I'm more interested in the amount of disturbance the  
broadfork does to the community of soil organisms. What does it do to  
micorizzal fungi? Would their be much loss of carbon from the soil.  
If you just rock back on the fork enough to move the soil would that  
keep the disturbance low enough while causing enough loosening for  
good root growth? I guess that depends on the definition of enough.  
Isn't root growth the purpose of using the broadfork?

Marty
Kansas City
On Feb 1, 2007, at 12:43 AM, Steve Diver wrote:

> Paul wrote:
>
> "I'm sure you understand that shallow weed hoeing
> (or using the broadfork) is not tillage."
>
>
> Fyi, I've always viewed the broadfork as the gardeners
> equivalent of a chisel plow (primary tillage), to be followed
> by a Warren hoe and then a four-prong rake (secondary tillage)
> to break up the clods and prepare a seedbed.
>
> Steve Diver
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Market-farming mailing list
> Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming
>
>
>




More information about the Market-farming mailing list