[Market-farming] Squash maturity

Glen Eco Farm glenecofarm at planetcomm.net
Wed Aug 15 20:58:57 EDT 2007


Wow!  That must have been some kind of a storm!  First immediate question: 
Are the vines still attached to the roots?  If so I would give them a chance 
to muster up enouch energy to regenerate a few new leaves and still mature 
the fruit.  Has the fruit sized up to maximum size or developed most of it's 
color?  Here in Virginia's zone 6 climate much of the winter squash has 
gotten up to what I would consider mature size.  Mine got planted 3 weeks to 
a month later than usual and the bigger fruits are not quite mature but if a 
calamity like yours were to hit I think they would still have a fighting 
chance.  If you cut the vines off you know you will take away that chance.

What part of Wisconsin are you in?  I have friends near Oseola.  I wonder 
how they are faring.

Marlin Burkholder
Shenandoah Valley in Virginia

PS:  The new house is framed up and under roof with most of the wiring and 
plumbing done.  Drywall hanging is scheduled to         begin next week.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: <frshstrt at baldwin-telecom.net>
To: <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2007 5:27 PM
Subject: Re: [Market-farming] Squash maturity


> Hi!  We were hit with wind and hail  Monday night and all my crops are
> destroyed.  Was wondering if the vines on winter squash are still
> attached to the fruit -will they continue to mature or should I cut them
> off?  I lost my greenhouse and all my veggies and cut flowers but we
> were blessed since lots of people lost houses, barns and much more.  Lu
> in Wisconsin
> _______________________________________________
> Market-farming mailing list
> Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming
>
>
>
>
> -- 
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.476 / Virus Database: 269.11.19/953 - Release Date: 8/14/2007 
> 5:19 PM
>
> 




More information about the Market-farming mailing list