[Market-farming] Re: T-Tape

Roger Weeks rjweeks70 at comcast.net
Mon Jul 19 10:34:02 EDT 2004


I think you'll really regret it if you _don't_ bury the T-Tape.

You can't easily cultivate around your plants when the T-Tape is on the 
surface.  You'll cut the T-Tape with hoes, step on it with your feet, 
and animals of various kinds will attempt to chew on it.

The rows in my field where T-Tape is on the surface have a LOT more weed 
germination around the plants, because the surface of the dirt is wet.

I don't have rocky soil, and I bought the 8 mil middleweight T-Tape with 
the intent on replacing it each year.  The smallest roll you can buy is 
about 1500'.  If you only need 600 a roll will last you two years.

Roger

Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2004 21:08:49 -0400
From: Allan Balliett <igg at igg.com>
Subject: [Market-farming] Re: Sub-irrigation
To: Market Farming <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>

We have hard water in this area. Things like water heaters have
fairly short lives. So does soaker hose. One season is about all I
get and then it just as well be regular garden hose. (I assume could
soak it in vinegar or something) I'd be very uncomfortable with
relying on it buried underground. Thanks, though. _Allan

market-farming-request at lists.ibiblio.org wrote:
> Send Market-farming mailing list submissions to
> 	market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
> 
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> 	http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> 	market-farming-request at lists.ibiblio.org
> 
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> 	market-farming-owner at lists.ibiblio.org
> 
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of Market-farming digest..."
> 
> 
> Today's Topics:
> 
>    1. response/lettuce cover/chili peppers question (mtlivestock)
>    2. EU Project Highlights Nutritional Value of Organic Production
>       Systems (Food News)
>    3. Re: Shade cloth for lettuce (Pat Meadows)
>    4. Re: Shade cloth for lettuce (robert schuler)
>    5. Re: Sub-irrigation (sora at coldreams.com)
>    6. Re: Re: Sub-irrigation (Willie McKemie)
>    7. Re: Re: Sub-irrigation (Eastex Farms)
>    8. Re: Sub-irrigation (Allan Balliett)
>    9. Nut Grass - any herbicide suggestions and	techniques?
>       (Craig Gilbert)
>   10. Re: Shade cloth for lettuce (Joan Vibert)
>   11. Re: Nut Grass - any herbicide suggestions	andtechniques?
>       (Vic & Pat Jackowsky)
>   12. Middle Eastern Gherkens (aka Burr Cucumbers) (Marlin Burkholder)
>   13. Re: Shade cloth for lettuce (Allan Balliett)
>   14. Re: Middle Eastern Gherkens (aka Burr Cucumbers) (Allan Balliett)
>   15. Re: Shade cloth for lettuce (Joan Vibert)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2004 12:09:38 -0600
> From: "mtlivestock" <crublee at libby.org>
> Subject: [Market-farming] response/lettuce cover/chili peppers
> 	question
> To: <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <001901c46cf2$64299a30$5c81c541 at george>
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> <<<I was just having some fun.>>>
> Yes.  Me too!  There must be something in the air.
> ............................................................................
> ...................
> Reading with interest the lettuce cover thread.  Any recycled materials that
> are better than others?  I planted some Mesclun Mix recently, but it is slow
> to grow.  Adding customers weekly, so I could really use some ideas! I will
> try to search online this week and share if I come up with anything good.
> 
> Is anyone sprouting the lettuce seeds before planting?
> 
> ............................................................................
> ........................
> CHILI PEPPERS!
> I have chili peppers coming out of my ears!  But I need ideas to market them
> to customers since I was not planning to sell much of these at first.
> Recent diet changes forces us to sell more than planned.
> 
> I searched the Internet and found a website: http://www.pepperclicks.com
> 
> But I have yet to find many great recipes or ideas.  I don't have a
> regulated scale yet, so I would have to sell by the number or bag.  The
> peppers are not big.  Any ideas?  I am sorry to ask, but I just can't find
> much in my searches.
> 
> Christina
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2004 12:28:22 -0400
> From: Food News <foodnews at ca.inter.net>(Redirected by "Tradingpost"
> 	<tradingpost at gilanet.com>)
> Subject: [Market-farming] EU Project Highlights Nutritional Value of
> 	Organic Production Systems
> To: market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
> Message-ID: <200407181212280619.05A0575B at mail.gilanet.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> 
> (Redirected by "Tradingpost" <tradingpost at gilanet.com>)
> 
> Policy Gap: The European Union is funding a major project to learn about how different production systems effect the quality and safety of food. This project brings our attention to a significant gap in nutrition policy: seldom considering food security from a consumer's perspective, the added nutritional value of organic food is often neglected. Foodnews invites reader responses on this issue. 
> Improving quality and safety and reduction of costs in the European organic and low input supply chain
> June 15 2004
> The European Union is funding a new 18M Euro Integrated Project 'QualityLowInputFood' that aims to improve quality, ensure safety and improve productivity along the European organic and other "low input" food supply chains (see project website: www.qlif.org for details).
> 
> 
> The Integrated project will involve thirty-one research institutions, industrial companies and universities (listed below) throughout Europe and beyond. , with a total budget of 18 million Euro. Five of the eight industrial partners are Small to Medium size Enterprises and all eight are involved in the production, processing or quality assurance of organic food. Thus, this Integrated Project integrates the critical mass of activities and resources needed to achieve ambitious scientific and technological objectives. 
> 
> The research will encompass the whole food chain from fork to farm for protected crops (tomato), field vegetables (lettuce, onion, potato, carrot, cabbage), fruit (apple), cereal (wheat), pork, dairy and poultry. It will measure consumer attitudes and expectations, and will develop new technologies to improve nutritional, sensory, microbiological and toxicological quality/safety of organic foods. All the project's innovations will be assessed for their socio-economic, environmental and sustainability impacts.
> 
> 
> The research will provide meaningful information that is currently lacking on the extent to which differences in production systems affect nutritional value, taste and safety of food. The project is expected to make a significant impact on increasing the competitiveness of the organic industry to the benefit of the European consumers and organic farmers. 
> 
> Major results from the integrated project and other completed or ongoing European research projects will be reported at the "Organic Farming, Food Quality and Human Health Congress" which will be held between the 6th and 9th of January 2005 at Newcastle University. The conference is aimed at farmers, processors, traders/retailers, consumer organisations and other stakeholders in the food supply chain (see www.qlif.org for details).
> 
> 
> Low input for high returns
> European citizens want agriculture to provide tasty, safe, affordable and nutritious food without damaging the environment. "Low input" farming minimises or completely avoids the use of synthetic pesticides and fertilisers. The best known low input system is organic farming, which is one of the most dynamic sectors of agriculture in Europe, but also faces substantial challenges to meet consumers' demands for safe, high quality, affordable organic food. The European Commission's Sixth Framework Programme (FP6) has allocated 685 million Euro for research and development in the area of Food Quality and Safety, such as "safer and environmentally friendly production methods and technologies and healthier foodstuffs", "impact of food on health"; and "traceability processes all along the production chain". The project 'QualityLowInputFood' brings together European expertise in an 18 million Euro Integrated Project to improve quality, ensure safety and reduce cost along the Europe
an 
>  organic and "low input" food supply chains.
> 
> 
> Start with the Consumer .
> 
> One of the first investigations will ask consumers what they want from low input foods, and measure what they actually buy, to determine what producers need to do to satisfy consumer demand. Other researchers will compare "low-input" and conventional products for qualities such as nutritional value, taste, shelf life, and processing characteristics, and for risks related to reduced fertility, pathogens and toxins from fungi. The aim here is to understand how these benefits and hazards can be optimised and controlled throughout the chain. 
> 
> 
> Then the Producer .
> 
> Based on this, scientists will develop novel techniques to produce better  products as cost-effectively as possible, and disseminate them to professionals in the food industry. Focus here will be on farm-based research in cereals, vegetables, dairy, poultry and pork production. For example, agronomists will test different management strategies for improvements in soil fertility, disease, weed and pest control to improve yields of high quality, organic plant foods, while livestock experts will assess how improved husbandry methods and feeding regimes can improve the nutritional quality of organic milk and minimise parasites and bacterial infections in pig and dairy production.  
> 
> 
> The project involves 31 partners, including Universities, Research Institutes and industrial companies. Five of the eight industrial partners are Small to Medium size Enterprises and all eight are involved in the production, processing or quality assurance of organic food. 
> 
> 
> Each year of the project, a major congress will be held to present the results of this and other projects on organic and "low input" agriculture to representatives of producers, processors, retailers, consumers and other user groups. The first major congress will take place between the 6.-9. January 2005 at Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyner, UK and has been jointly organised with the Soil Association, one of Europe's major organic farming organisations. In addition to first results from the integrated project major outputs from other R&D projects funded by the EU, national governments and industry will be presented. Details can be found on the project website (www.qlif.org).
> 
>  Partner List 
> 
> 1.      University of Newcastle upon Tyne (Overall Co-ordinator, England, UK)
> 
> 2.      Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (Academic Co-ordinator, Switzerland)
> 
> 3.      Danish Research Centre for Organic Farming/Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences (Denmark)
> 
> 4.      Praktijkonderzoek Veehouderij BV (Netherlands)
> 
> 5.      University of Kassel (Germany)
> 
> 6.      Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association (England, UK)
> 
> 7.      University of Wales, Aberystwyth (Wales, UK)
> 
> 8.      Louis Bolk Institute (Netherlands)
> 
> 9.      Alma Matur Studiorum - Universitat di Bologna (Italy)
> 
> 10.  Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (France)
> 
> 11.  Warsaw Agricultural University (Poland)
> 
> 12.  University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria)
> 
> 13.  Universidad de Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro (Portugal)
> 
> 14.  Technological Educational Institute of Crete (Crete, Greece)
> 
> 15.  Vysoka Skola Chemickotechnologicka v Praze, Prague (Czech Republic)
> 
> 16.  Bar Ilan University (Israel)
> 
> 17.  University of Helsinki (Finland)
> 
> 18.  TUBITAK-Marmara Research Centre (Turkey)
> 
> 19.  University of Bonn (Germany)
> 
> 20.  University of Basel (Switzerland)
> 
> 21.  Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research (Wales, UK)
> 
> 22.  Universitat Hohenheim (Germany)
> 
> 23.  Universita Politecnica della Marche (Italy)
> 
> 24.  Granarolo SPA (Italy)
> 
> 25.  Roger White and Associates (England, UK)
> 
> 26.  Guaber SPA (Italy)
> 
> 27.  Anidral SRL (Italy)
> 
> 28.  Gilchesters Organics (England, UK)
> 
> 29.  Agro Eco Consultancy B.V. (Netherlands)
> 
> 30.  Swiss Federal Dairy Research Station, Liebefeld (Switzerland)
> 
> 31.  Groupe de Recherche et d'Echanges Technologiques (France)
> 
>  More information
> 
> 
> QualityLowInputFood Website:            http://www.qlif.org
> 
> 
> Project co-ordinator:                      Prof. C. Leifert, University of Newcastle, Nafferton                                                          Farm, Stocksfield, NE43 7XD, UK. 
> 
>                                                 Tel. +44-1661-830222; e-mail: qlif at ncl.ac.uk
> 
>  
> 
> Academic co-ordinator:             Dr Urs Niggli, Research Institute of Organic 
> 
>                                                 Agriculture (FiBL), CH-5070 Frick, CH.
> 
>                                                 Tel. +41-62-8657270; e-mail: qlif at fibl.ch
> 
> 
> WHO WE ARE: This e-mail service shares information to help more people discuss crucial policy issues affecting global food security.  The service is managed by Amber McNair of the University of Toronto in association with the Munk Centre for International Studies and Wayne Roberts of the Toronto Food Policy Council, in partnership with the Community Food Security Coalition, World Hunger Year, and International Partners for Sustainable Agriculture.  
> Please help by sending information or names and e-mail addresses of co-workers who'd like to receive this service, to foodnews at ca.inter.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2004 14:43:34 -0400
> From: Pat Meadows <pat at meadows.pair.com>
> Subject: Re: [Market-farming] Shade cloth for lettuce
> To: Market Farming <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <a2hlf09pq744dv5jqhfa4okgd874g81h2p at 4ax.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> 
> On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 07:48:43 -0500, you wrote:
> 
> 
>>I noticed in the Farmtek catalog that they have a knitted shade cloth in
>>either black or white that can be cut without raveling.  I was wondering
>>about trying it over hoops covering lettuce beds for summer growing.  I have
>>recently seeded more lettuce and kept the soil cool(er) during germination
>>with rolls of burlap - but now that the lettuce is up I'd like to keep it
>>out of the heat as much as possible.  And I hate the regular shade cloth
>>because of the raveling it does.  Is there such as thing as a remay-type
>>shade?
>>
> 
> 
> I don't know how much of it you would need, or if this would
> help you...
> 
> I have been using 'landscaping fabric' bought (in error) at
> the local garden center.  This is a thin black fabric that
> looks very much like non-woven interfacing (as used in
> sewing clothing).  I bought it by mistake, thinking it was
> something else.  
> 
> It doesn't ravel, and it seems to work nicely as shade
> cloth.
> 
> Pat



More information about the Market-farming mailing list