"Minor" subdivisions of land

Aozotorp at aol.com Aozotorp at aol.com
Sat Aug 18 12:38:55 EDT 2001


In a message dated 8/16/01 9:35:30 PM Mountain Daylight Time, 
marc at aculink.net writes:

<< At the state level it's been the same problem in Colorado.
 
 There has been considerable controversy at the state level
 but no one has been able to come up with a solution. We have
 had a massive influx of out of sateres - especially
 Californians who got some BIG money for their little houses
 that will buy a BIG hunk of Colorado. The governor was
 actually upset at the lack of progress.
 
 At the county level the power is quite variable and the
 State Legislature was attempting to work up a state wide
 plan to manage growth.
 
 Of several selfish special interest groups was a strong
 political movement of farmers and ranchers opposed to things
 that would cause a property devaluation without
 compensation.
 
 Farmers and Ranchers are so difficult to get to cooperate.
 You'd think it was their land.
  >>


Letter to the editor from Westword - Weekly Magazine in Colo!

http://www.westword.com/issues/2001-08-16/letters.html

Little housing subsidy on the prairie: Sprawl is simply government-subsidized 
housing for homeowners, $110 billion per year in the form of 
mortgage-interest deductions, capital-gains exclusions and property-tax 
writeoffs. These tax gimmicks are supported by three powerful 
special-interest groups: the real estate lobby, the banking industry and the 
homebuilder/contractor lobby. 

Families with yearly incomes of over $100,000 receive the major share of the 
subsidized-housing benefits. The main economic effect is to inflate the price 
and size of homes while diverting investment away from other sectors of the 
economy. The home-mortgage interest deduction costs the federal government 
more than twice as much as is spent on low-income housing assistance and 
low-rent public housing. There are no limits or restrictions on it -- the 
deduction applies to summer homes in Aspen and beach compounds in Key West. 
It's worth about $5,000 a year, on average, to individuals making more than 
$200,000. 

There are no facts that support the real estate industry's contention that 
these tax gimmicks promote home ownership. Canada has the same rate of home 
ownership as the United States, without the benefit of the tax subsidies. 

Help stop the renters' penalty! 

Abolish all forms of homeowner-subsidized housing! 



More information about the Market-farming mailing list