Lowering pH

Peg Cook pegcook at northnet.org
Sat Oct 21 11:00:02 EDT 2000


I would highly recommend to everyone to BE CAREFUL when dealing with trace
elements!!!!!  I have seen so many Growers (vegetables, small fruits,
ornamentals and field crops) screw up their crops by the addition of trace
elements.  The best way that I have seen in my 29 years of soil testing and
crop consulting in handling trace elements is to "balance the soil system"
while using Soft or Black Rock Phosphate as well as other "commercial"
organic fertilizers.  When you are talking in "ppm" for a trace element over
an acre size area, you do need much to create toxicity problems to foul up
nutrient uptake!!!  To put this in perspective, think of a 5 Lb. bag of
sugar and you are going to spread this over 43,560 sqft.!!!

Peg Cook, Agronomist
Cook's Consulting
Lowville, NY.

pegcook at northnet.org

----- Original Message -----
From: robert schuler <sunnfarm at bellatlantic.net>
To: market farming <market-farming at franklin.oit.unc.edu>
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2000 9:53 AM
Subject: Re: Lowering pH


> Hello Charlie, My vegetable co-op's biggest export customer is the Virgin
Islands
> area so I probably should not try to help you :-) its common to inject
acids into
> irrigation water to lower Ph and just 5 minutes after receiving your note
I came
> across one such product in a trade paper called "N-pHuric", by Prodica LLC
in Brea
> Calif this product is less than 1 pH, such products are not  earthworm
friendly
> but you decide, you can get past the iron and zinc deficiencies with
foliar
> fertilizers, check your water supply and have it buffered to a proper
level, I had
> 40 acres of limestone soil with a pH of 8 and OM of 4% that was the most
> productive land I ever owned until they built an interstate highway on it,
I had
> soils tested yearly and had fertilizers custom blended to over come zinc
and iron
> def., I banded acidifing fertilizers like diammonium phosphate to create a
small
> low pH zone along each row and it worked out very well
> Sunny Meadow Farm
> Bridgeton, NJ.
>
> Charlie Shultz wrote:
>
> > Dear Farm-Friends,
> >
> > I recently established a few large raised beds for vegetable production
in
> > the Virgin Islands (yes, 12 month growing season).  I will soon have a
> > complete soil analysis done, but managed to get a pH reading yesterday.
My
> > pH is high, about 8.6.  Unfortunately I have already planted my various
> > crops and don't know how to lower the pH without stressing the plants.
Can
> > anyone recommend a method for lowering pH in an established veggie bed?
> >
> > Thanks in advance,
> > Charlie
> > Sunny St. Croix
> >
> >
_________________________________________________________________________
> > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at
http://www.hotmail.com.
> >
> > Share information about yourself, create your own public profile at
> > http://profiles.msn.com.
> >
> > ---
> > You are currently subscribed to market-farming as:
sunnfarm at bellatlantic.net
> > To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-market-farming at franklin.oit.unc.edu
> > To subscribe send email to lyris at franklin.oit.unc.edu
> > with message text containing: subscribe market-farming <your name>
>
>
> ---
> You are currently subscribed to market-farming as: pegcook at northnet.org
> To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-market-farming at franklin.oit.unc.edu
> To subscribe send email to lyris at franklin.oit.unc.edu
> with message text containing: subscribe market-farming <your name>
>




More information about the Market-farming mailing list