(fwd) Re: Is there anybody there?

Lawrence F. London, Jr. lflondon at mindspring.com
Tue Jun 20 22:30:13 EDT 2000



[Forwarded from alt.sustainable.agriculture newsgroup]

On Tue, 20 Jun 2000 15:51:44 GMT, in alt.sustainable.agriculture Lucky
Horseshoe Farms <lkyhorseshoe at ispchannel.com> wrote:

Hi Janet
We are out here.  I would like to tell you how we got here.  Back in
1972 my
wife and I were living in central Ohio.  We both loved the out of
doors.  Many
of our adventures led us to the small pockets of woods weaved in and
out of
farm land.  The death & illness among the wildlife was looked at by
the farmers
we met along the way  as just part of Farming.  Of course not all the
farmers
were like that, the old ones knew about farming with nature.  They
would try to
teach the children but the county agent convinced The young ones the
new
Chemical way of Agribusiness would bring them more profit with less
work.  Well
to make a long story short we started an Organic Farm not a good
choice if you
wanted to fit in.  Moved to the mountains of NC in 1980.  Some advice
on
changing the way farmers and the public use the land.  I really don't
have a
clue.  One day you're working you're crops and a car load of farmers
sons fly
by loosing a barrage of Beer bottles at you and you're wife.  A few
decades
later you are right in the middle of an Organic Panic and can't grow
enough to
fill the demand.  I think the solution is and always has been in the
pocketbooks of all the consumers.  I'm an organic farmer you know we
make out
like bandits NOT.  My point is If we can buy locally grown organic
products
that we don't produce and hits our cash reserves hard.  Think of the
impact to
agriculture nation wide this would have if people said my personal
health is
worth more than money can't buy back.  We are on the WWW go and see
for
yourself very few countries are driving the small farmer out of
business.  When
you allow this because you wanted to save a few cents on those cheap
vegetables.  You send a message to the food brokers and there reply
was to
bring you those cheap vegetables from countries that are using
pesticides the
USA banned 30 years ago.  We grow Heirloom Fruits & Vegetables using.
S.A.M.
Sustainable Agricultural Methods.
http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/index.html
         If you growers would like to share get involved.  I saw it
happen in
my lifetime and hope springs eternal that it won't be a fad but
instead it
might just be the fruit from the seeds we planted many moons ago.
            Best regards Mike & linda @ Lucky Horse Farm.


"janet.jackson" wrote:

> Hi I thought I would start the ball rolling ....hmmmm!
>
> Is there anybody out there interested in sustainable agriculture....sorry I
> know...its difficult launching into cyberspace: I'm a novice at this; I am
> interested in conversing with like minded folk though.
>
> Through my work and studies I have been increasingly involved with wildlife
> surveys in agricultural landscapes. The implications of non-sustainable
> agricultural practice are apparent when you start to look more closely and
> find degraded habitats and reduced biodiversity.  Finding species, once
> regarded as most common, becomes an noteable event.
>
> I would like to hear how some might promote sustainable practice in
> agriculture, and how landowners and tennants may be persuaded to change
> their ways.
>
> Yep...my life's my work!
>
> janet

Lawrence F. London, Jr. Venaura Farm ICQ#27930345
lflondon at mindspring.com  london at metalab.unc.edu
metalab.unc.edu/intergarden InterGarden
metalab.unc.edu/permaculture PermaSphere
metalab.unc.edu/intergarden/orgfarm AGINFO




More information about the Market-farming mailing list