soy to my world

Ava Devenport essenheal at iname.com
Fri Jun 9 11:03:14 EDT 2000


On 06/06/00, "Hugh Lovel <uai at alltel.net>" wrote:
> Dear Ava,
> 
> Pardon my ignorance, but what is razor clay?> 
> Best,
> Hugh

> >Dear Hugh:
> >
> >You mention red clay, what about razor clay?  Will the soybean enjoy this
> >medium also?  > >
> >Blessings,
> >Ava
> >
> >---

Dear Hugh:

Sorry to take so long to respond, but lately I seem to be catching myself 
coming when I should be going & vise-versa....

The Razor series is that wonderfully dark, slippery, sticky clay.  It's 
moderately deep, well drained & formed on uplands in clayey residuum 
weathered from shale.  It's underlain by shale at a depth of 20-40 inches.

Representative profile: surface layer is light olive-brown heavy clay loam 
about 4 inches thick, subsoil is grayish-brown silty clay about 11 inches 
thick and the underlying material is light brownish-gray clay about 15 
inches thick over light brownish-gray soft shale that extends to a depth of 
60 inches or more.  Permeability is slow and the available water capacity 
is low.  The soil is moderately alkaline and root zones extends to a depth 
of 20-40 inches.  Native vegetation is mainly short plains grasses and the 
slope is 1 to 5 percent.  Average annual precipitation is 12 inches (annual 
evaporation rate is 5 feet) with avg. annual temps of 53 degrees and the 
frost-free season is 145-175 days.  Sunshine averages 300+ days.

Do you think I could grow soybeans here as a harvestable crop, or would 
they only grow as mainly a 'green-manure' crop?

Blessings,
Ava
> >You are currently subscribed to market-farming as: uai at alltel.net
> >To unsubscribe send a blank email to
> >$subst('Email.Unsub')
> >To subscribe send email to lyris at franklin.oit.unc.edu
> >with message text containing: subscribe market-farming <your name>



More information about the Market-farming mailing list