[Homestead] Education---Catch 'em early

Tvoivozhd tvoivozd at infionline.net
Sat Sep 18 16:24:59 EDT 2004


clanSkeen wrote:

>
>
>
>>From TVO's article:
>
>  
>
>>Classrooms should serve 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds. Appropriate
>>programs should also be provided for younger children.
>>    
>>
>
>Tvo, you are fond of saying that education works like any other business.
>Think back on all the businesses whose reins you have held over the years
>and tell us how they would have fared if they had been run as Mass is
>running its education system.  When I was a child, there was no
>Kindergarten.  As the education system fell into decay, K for 5 year olds
>was added to get children ready for "real" school as six year olds.  Over
>the years we've added K-4 to get them ready for K-5 and now K-3 to get them
>ready for K-4.  The article you forward says that the system wants to start
>even younger! What next?  Rip the infant off its mother's breast and take it
>away to a 3 month old program for fear it won't be ready for the K-1
>program?   Start the education process in utero?
>  
>

tvoivozhd---children learn best if education commences at the earliest 
age possible.  First grade students do better if they have been in 
Kindergarten---that's why the education-fanatic Germans introduced it 
and observed the consequences on their children to prove their concept.

>Then along the way there are countless alternate and remedial programs
>because despite robbing the craddle, the education still isn't successful.
>Finally these children go to college and we find a large part still
>functionally illiterate and must have classes on a middle school level to
>continue as 19 year olds.
>
>Since education is supposed to be operating like any other business, how
>many of the businesses that you ran could have survived like this?  The
>factory floor can't turn out the product so we start conditioning,
>pre-manufacturing the product before it gets there.  The product is still
>not functional so we have to have post-factory remediation for years
>afterwards.
>  
>

tvoivozhd---hell, yes---read my other post on seven components of the 
education business.  Many of the components which used to be adequately 
addressed in the Germanic/Scandinavian communities, no longer are---and 
under the Republicrats don't expect them to be addressed at all.

>Tvo adds:
>
>  
>
>>Cost of early education is less than any alternative.  I don't care how
>>the hell it is done, just do it.
>>    
>>
>
>Here is where you have tunnel vision.  The only solution you allow for the
>problem is more teachers making more money.   Cost is less than ANY
>alternative?  How are you coming up with this?   There are scores of
>alternatives that are less costly and more effective.  They don't all
>involve paying high salaries to PhD's and so they seem to slip completely
>off your radar screen.
>  
>

tvoivozhd---batshit---I say and REPEAT, adequate salaries are a 
NECESSARY component.  And yes, the cost of NOT running the education 
business properly is VASTLY more expensive than running it properly.

My radar screen says their is NO mass-education alternative to the 
public school system.  You do home-schooling and I might do home 
schooling, but in spite of online educational material today, it is a 
puny number of parents practice it---what is the number, 1.3 million?, 
1.6 million, no matter, it is a trivial amount. And except in very rare 
circumstances like in an affiliation with a richly funded public school, 
home-schoolers are excluded from working in expensive laboratories---a 
terrible handicap in an increasingly high-tech age.

>>From the article:
>
>
>  
>
>>Children learn about words and numbers, but they also develop behavioral
>>skills such as sitting still and paying attention. Most important, early
>>education should be an exciting experience that makes children eager to
>>learn.
>>    
>>

tvoivozhd---running screaming around the room hardly qualifies as a 
learning enviroment.  A zoo is a zoo is a zoo whether the inhabitants 
are three years old or teen-age combat units in high school..  If some 
degree of self-discipline is not  inculcated at an early age it is not a 
part of teen-age habits.   Self-discipline and exciting Kindergarten or 
first-grade learning experience are sure as hell not 
mutually-exclusive---to say so is REALLY sick.

>
>How can you read this and not see how sick it is?  Two and three year olds
>will be indoctrinated to sit still and "pay attention" on demand (ie 'be
>brainwashed') but most importantly it "should be an exciting experience that
>makes children eager to learn."   Hello!!  Children are born eager to learn
>until the instinct is beaten out of them by making them sit still and pay
>attention!  Just sick.  And sicker still is that any child with the
>fortitude and will to resist it will be declared to be ADD or ADHD or ODD or
>ZYX and drugged out of his gourd until he too sits there like a zombie.
>Utterly sick.
>
>
>  
>
>>Too many children enter kindergarten with the heartbreaking
>>feeling that they won't be good at learning.
>>    
>>
>
>Eh ... the heartbreaking feeling that they too will not be a will-less,
>mindless indoctrinated zombie.  We set this sick goal as the norm and then
>make children feel bad about themselves if they don't submit to it.
>
>James
>  
>

tvoivoahd---yeah, let the little monsters kick each other in the shins  
pull hair and throw bowling pinat each other---wouldn't want to make 
them feel bad by stopping it, would you?

>
>_______________________________________________
>Homestead list and subscription:
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/homestead
>Change your homestead list member options:
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/options/homestead/tvoivozd%40infionline.net
>View the archives at:
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/homestead
>
>
>
>  
>





More information about the Homestead mailing list