[cc-community] Making money with By-SA

Terry Hancock hancock at anansispaceworks.com
Mon May 29 06:26:07 EDT 2006


Rob Myers wrote:
>  On 26 May 2006, at 12:44, drew Roberts wrote:
> > On Friday 26 May 2006 06:19 am, rob at robmyers.org wrote:
> >> Quoting drew Roberts <zotz at 100jamz.com>:
> >>> I know, and if we can get his done with pure copyleft while
> >>> people can still find ways to earn a living, I would prefer
> >>> that route, but we may need to take some funny paths to get
> >>> there.
> >>
> >> We have some ways mapped out already and a few people trying
> >> them. We just need to distract a few more people from the siren
> >> call of NC.
> >
> > Can you let us in on any of them at this time?
>
>  Sorry I meant the merchandising & performance (Loca) and Street
>  Performer Protocol (Elephants Dream) routes. These are all used in
>  proprietary culture as well, SPP is used by bands and by Russian
>  novelists.

I should like to point out that SPP is a means of raising up-front
capital for a free project that requires it.  Elephants Dream also
relied on "pre-sales", another useful means of doing the same:
http://www.blender3d.org/e-shop/product_info.php?products_id=84

Now you can't copy a pre-sale, because you don't have it: so that
amounts to a closed license on vaporware, which lasts for a
proprietary period until the vaporware becomes downloadable-
ware. Of course, if you're me, you're going to pay for a copy
even after completion, because (a) it's just easier and (b) you
want to make the method work (customer goodwill).

A limited duration NC permits exactly the same model, except
the customer gets to "try before they buy".  Vaporware sales
are liable to suffer from varying degrees of poor trust in the
completion of the work (or quality).

Another case is the business model proposed by Free Software
Magazine (and other publishers), which permits you to free-license
your articles (encourages, actually), but keeps a temporary
blackout until the issue comes out.  This is basically the same
idea, but with durations of 1-6 months (currently FSM is all
online, has no subscription fee, and essentially no blackout
period -- but it will probably revert to a somewhat longer period
when it goes back to print publication).
http://freesoftwaremagazine.com

The advantages of this kind of decentralized, low
trust-requirement fund-raising (over centrally-managed
systems) should be obvious to anyone with a grasp of
capitalist economics, but perhaps the idea of using
capitalism in a sane and non-exploitative way is not so
obvious nowadays. ;-)

It just isn't true that capitalist business models are fundamentally
opposed to free development or the commons. There are many
different ways for them to interact.

The only problem with that is the guarantee.   (E.g. how long
has Sun been trying to make us think they're 'about' to release
Java open-source or that the existing license is 'open enough'?).

This is one major use-case I had in mind when I proposed the
idea that some form of sunset on NC/ND would be a useful
CC license module.  It would enable a simple way to make this
guarantee explicit and legally-enforceable (the artist would
already have made the required license grant, post-dated).

It also defuses the whole "siren call" issue by making an NC
choice possible which lacks the long-term deleterious effects.
Of course, it is a compromise, but so are RSPP, pre-sales,
etc.

Cheers,
Terry

-- 
Terry Hancock (hancock at AnansiSpaceworks.com)
Anansi Spaceworks http://www.AnansiSpaceworks.com




More information about the cc-community mailing list