[b-hebrew] Ezek 3:26

Jerry Shepherd jshepherd53 at gmail.com
Mon Jul 29 20:59:45 EDT 2013


Hi Karl,



You said: "Of course it’s not the same thing! That’s why Ruth made a point
of it."



Karl, you missed entirely the point of what I was saying.  Ruth made a
distinction between form and function.  Your subsequent attempt to capture
her thought by framing it as a distinction between action and function was
incorrect.  You can't say that I was making a confusion, as Ruth would say,
between action and function, when that was not a distinction that Ruth made.



You said: "While you are right that it mainly affects verbs and nouns, it
also fits adjectives, adverbs, etc."



I said that it affects verbs, and only nouns that name actions.  It does
not normally affect adjectives, adverbs, etc.  What action is being named
by the noun "shirt," or the adjective "orange" or the adverb "well"?  These
lexemes are not properly referred to by the word "action,"



You said, "This paragraph is a logical fallacy, namely the appeal to
popularity."



This was in reaction to my statement, "The problem you have here is that
there is not a trained linguist in the entire universe who would hold to
that opinion."



This was not an appeal to popularity; rather it was simply pointing out the
obvious.  There is no linguist who would agree with you.  Therefore, the
burden is on you to prove your case, rather than the other way around.



You said, "This makes me think you have not read a word I’ve written. Or
rather, you have latched on to a word or phrase that is a trigger to your
thinking, and have not listened to the whole, rather just stopped listening
to make your argument. . .  Your argument has missed the mark."



Karl, I captured your thought very well.  You were the one who said that in
all these instances a person is being "called aside," and that this was
what was in the "inside the head of the ancient Greek."  And you expressly
said that in all these instances the verb "παρακαλειν does NOT mean to
instruct, to scold, to encourage, to upbraid."  My argument was right on
target because what you do here is a classic example of the etymological
fallacy.



Blessings,


Jerry

Jerry Shepherd
Taylor Seminary
Edmonton, Alberta
jshepherd53 at gmail.com
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/b-hebrew/attachments/20130729/001743f0/attachment.html 


More information about the b-hebrew mailing list