[b-hebrew] one-to-one rendering of olam

Joseph Roberts josephroberts3 at gmail.com
Sun Dec 12 14:40:02 EST 2010


I have always understood Olam and its counter-part in Greek (aiwn) as being
like something beyond the horizon. to say something is beyond the horizon
does not say that it is a certain distance beyond the horizon it means
beyond what you can see, this could mean forever or a mile beyond the
horizon. I think sometimes in Hebrew and even Greek its better to look at
things more concrete than abstract.

Joseph Roberts

On Sun, Dec 12, 2010 at 10:39 AM, Isaac Fried <if at math.bu.edu> wrote:

> In Gen. 13:15 AD OLAM is 'forever', namely, with no time limit set ––– with
> no statute of limitation. The fact that someone builds a house, a shed, a
> driveway, a fence, or whatnot, on your land is another issue; it happens
> everyday everywhere.
> Read again Jeremiah chapter 32, and recall verse 15:
>
> כי כה אמר יהוה צבאות אלהי ישראל עוד יקנו בתים ושדות וכרמים בארץ הזאת
>
> and tell me if he was right, or what.
>
> Isaac Fried, Boston University
>
>
>
> On Dec 12, 2010, at 1:03 PM, fred burlingame wrote:
>
>  Hello Isaac:
>>
>> Thanks for your comments.
>>
>> You could be right, since I am but the consumer 1,000 years removed,
>> rather than the creator, of the masoretic text.
>>
>> But ... how do you read עד עולם in genesis 13:15; and in the context of 2
>> chronicles 36:17? "forever?" "eternally?" And if so, how do you define
>> "forever" and "eternally" in terms of length of time?
>>
>> Or perhaps you understand עד עולם in this particular context, in yet a
>> third and different manner?
>>
>> I look forward to hearing from you, on your precise meaning of this phrase
>> in this verse?
>>
>> I note in closing that surely someone else's house stands on that land
>> today at this very moment.
>>
>> regards,
>>
>> fred burlingame
>>
>> On Sun, Dec 12, 2010 at 11:25 AM, Isaac Fried <if at math.bu.edu> wrote:
>> I am sorry to have to say this, but this talk of a "hidden" period of time
>> is in my opinion a symptom of a basic misunderstanding of the workings and
>> nature of the Hebrew language. The rest is theology.
>>
>> Isaac Fried, Boston University
>>
>>
>>
> _______________________________________________
> b-hebrew mailing list
> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
>



-- 
Joseph Roberts ( UCC 1-308)
THIS EMAIL TRANSMISSION IS INTENDED FOR THE EXCLUSIVE USE OF THE INDIVIDUAL
OR ENTITY TO WHOM IT IS ADDRESSED AND INTENDED, AND MAY CONTAIN PRIVILEDGED
AND CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION THAT IS COVERED BY THE ELECTRONIC
COMMUNICATIONS PRIVACY ACT (18 USC §§ 2510-2521). IF YOU ARE NOT THE INTENED
RECIPIENT OR AGENT RESPONSIBLE TO DELIVER THE MESSAGE TO THE INTENEDED
RECIPIENT, YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT ANY DISSEMINATION, DISTRIBUTION OR
COPYING OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED. IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED
THIS COMMUNICATION IN ERROR; PLEASE NOTIFY
JOSEPHROBERTS3 at GMAIL.COMIMMEDIATELY BY EMAIL AND DELETE THE ORIGINAL
AND COPIES OF MESSAGE. ALL
INFORMATION IN THIS EMAIL MAY BE SUBJECT TO COPYRIGHT AND TRADE MARK LAW
DOMESTICALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INTERNATIONALLY, U.C.C
1-207/ U.C.C. 1-308



More information about the b-hebrew mailing list