[b-hebrew] Lev 1:9 - Burnt Offering

Yigal Levin leviny1 at mail.biu.ac.il
Fri Oct 19 04:34:09 EDT 2007


OOPS, of course I meant "ascent, not "accent".

Yigal Levin
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Yigal Levin" <leviny1 at mail.biu.ac.il>
To: "b-hebrew" <b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Friday, October 19, 2007 10:30 AM
Subject: Re: [b-hebrew] Lev 1:9 - Burnt Offering


> Dear Bruce,
>
> Before anyone jumps on you, let me remind us all that whether Jesus was or
> was not Son of God is off limits for discussion on this list, which deals
> with the Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament to Christians). Of course, this 
> does
> not mean that anyone on this list is denied the right to believe that he
> was, just that it is not a topic for discussion.
>
> As to your question about the Hebrew word (Olah, which is often translated
> "burnt offering", that is a very legitimate question, and yes, you are
> correct - (Olah in Hebrew means "accent" or "something that goes up".
> Whether the term derives from the rising smoke, or from that fact that the
> sacrifice "goes up" to God in a more figurative sense is not clear. 
> Probably
> a little of both.
>
> And yes, the image of Jesus being a sacrifice which "accends" to God was
> probably influenced by the way in which animal sacrifices were seen by the
> Jews who were Jesus' early followers - remember, this image was formed 
> while
> the Jewish Second Temple was still standing and sacrifices were still 
> being
> offered.
>
> BTW, the idea that a holy man "accends" to God after his earthly death is
> not uniquly Christian. It is also a cornerstone of Kabbalah, or Jewish
> mysticism. The recently-published vol. 4 of the journal "Moreshet Israel"
> features an article by Sheli Goldberg: "'Ascent after Ascent' - The Soul 
> of
> the Zaddik after Death According to the Lubavitcher Rebbes". The journal 
> is
> in Hebrew, but there is an English abstract:
>
> This article shows the processes of change and ascendance that the 
> Zaddik's
> soul undergoes from the time of its 'histalkut' (passing away from the 
> world
> of matter) until its return to its source in the higher worlds, as 
> reflected
> in the teachings of the Chabad/Lubavitch leaders, especially those of the
> seventh leader, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Shneurson.
>
> In the Chabad philosophy, 'histalkut' is defined as 'ascendance' or 'going
> up', based on the perception of the soul as immortal, and by no means
> subject to extinction. The end of the soul's role in its physical 
> existence
> is perceived as the end of one chapter and the beginning of another, in
> which the process of ascendance of the Zaddik's soul is dynamic. This
> process is described in Chabad literature through a variety of terms and
> metaphors, such as 'Ilui Ahar Ilui' (ascent after ascent), 'Meolam Leolam'
> (from world to world), 'Midarga Ledarga' (from level to level), 'Derech 
> Ha'amud'
> (through the pillar), 'Gan Eden Hatachton' (lower paradise), 'Gan Eden 
> Ha'elyon'
> (upper paradise), 'Ta'anug' (spiritual pleasure) etc.
>
> The Zaddik's soul aspires to return to its upper source, and after its
> 'histalkut', experiences an active stage of ascendance: 'Rum Hamaalot'
> (uppermost level). This is a dialectic process whose aim is the 
> achievement
> of 'Ziv Hashechina' (uppermost pleasure) and 'Razin Deoreita' (Torah's 
> inner
> secrets).
>
> The ascendance process is complex since it is both individualistic and
> unified, finite and infinite. In other words, the structure of the
> ascendance is unified, and every Zaddik's soul passes through lower
> paradise, through the purification in Dinur River to upper paradise and 
> its
> many stages.
>
> More than any of his predecessors, the seventh Rebbe, the Ramam, 
> emphasized
> the establishment of the presence of the 'Shechina' in the lower world as
> the main duty of the seventh generation. This is the generation, defined 
> as
> 'the last for exile and first for redemption', which is to prepare the 
> world
> for the coming of the Messiah.
>
> The uniqueness of the seventh generation, which is attached to its Rebbe's
> soul in the upper world, finds its expression in the idea that the 
> bringing
> of redemption is not the task of unique people as has been believed
> throughout all generations. This is now considered the task of the whole
> generation. This shows the importance of every person's deeds in the 
> Jewish
> nation.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Yigal Levin
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Bruce Prince" <bruceprince at bigpond.com>
> To: "b-Hebrew List" <b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Sent: Friday, October 19, 2007 9:53 AM
> Subject: [b-hebrew] Lev 1:9 - Burnt Offering
>
>
>> Dear Folks
>>
>> I was recently interested to read that "burnt offering" (Heb:'olah) has
>> more
>> an implication of ascent rather than a sacrifice that is
>> simplyburnt/roasted
>> over flame.
>>
>> This is supported, among other things, by the smoke, which ascends, and
>> meets the approval of God. Also, as the sin offering pointed to the
>> ultimate
>> sacrifice of the Son of God, it can perhaps be seen that the act wasn't
>> completed until he had ascended to God the Father.
>>
>> I'm wondering if you, who are Hebrew linguists, could comment on this
>> please?
>>
>> Cheers
>>
>> Bruce Prince
>> Australia
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> b-hebrew mailing list
>> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
>>
>>
>>
>> -- 
>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.14.13/1074 - Release Date:
>> 16/10/2007 14:14
>>
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> b-hebrew mailing list
> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
>
>
>
> -- 
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.14.13/1074 - Release Date: 
> 16/10/2007 14:14
>
> 




More information about the b-hebrew mailing list