[b-hebrew] Explain it please

Isaac Fried if at math.bu.edu
Mon Dec 10 23:29:31 EST 2007


David,

Do you really think that I am, or was, denying the existence of the  
U, I, O, E sounds in Hebrew?

Isaac Fried, Boston University

On Dec 10, 2007, at 11:09 PM, David Kummerow wrote:

>
> Hi Isaac,
>
> It puzzles you, I think, because you seem to be unfamiliar with  
> basic linguistic principles and methodology, even though you  
> yourself propose something "linguistic".
>
> Am am unsure what you mean by "Where is the single vowel". It was  
> you who proposed this idea that BH has only one vowel (http:// 
> lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/b-hebrew/2007-November/034625.html).  
> Are you now suggesting that there are no vowels? or that there are  
> more than one vowel and that you are retracting your previous  
> assertion?
>
> I say it is "impossible" because human language requires more  
> contrast for linguistic production than what a single vowel can  
> provide. Known human languages around the world only minimally have  
> two vowels, so the burden of proof rests with you. Further, not  
> every theoretical vowel combinations are possible, but those with  
> greater contrasts are preferred. See Björn Lindblom, "Phonetic  
> universals in vowel systems," in Experimental phonology (John Ohala  
> and Jeri Jaeger, eds.; Dordrecht: Foris, 1986), 13-44.
>
> Regards,
> David Kummerow.
>
>
>> David,
>> I am really puzzled by your statement:
>> your contention -- again without adduced evidence -- that BH has  
>> only a
>> single vowel is linguistically impossible
>> Where is the single vowel and why is it linguistically impossible?
>> Isaac Fried, Boston University
>> On Dec 10, 2007, at 3:45 AM, David Kummerow wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Isaac,
>>>
>>> You wrote this:
>>>
>>>> 2. Even though -AH is in my opinion but a contracted HI) it may  
>>>> refer
>>>> to various agents and objects in various relationship modes. We  
>>>> have
>>>> YALDAH, 'girl, child-she', YALDAH, 'she gave birth, produced-a- 
>>>> chid-
>>>> she' and YALDAH, 'her boy, boy-she'.
>>>
>>> and this:
>>>
>>>> 4. In the adjective TOBAH, 'good', -AH refers to the feminine  
>>>> bearer
>>>> of the attribute, but in the noun TOBAH, 'favor, goodness', -AH
>>>> refers to the thing itself. Incidentally it is "female", as is
>>>> autostradah.
>>>> 5 The counterpart to MAR, 'mister' is MAR-AT, where -AT is  
>>>> surely the
>>>> personal pronoun AT, 'you'. MARAH is 'bitter'. Such is also the
>>>> relationship between GEBER and GBER-ET.
>>>
>>> What is the evidence for these assertions?
>>>
>>> What is your evidence for equating what has traditionally been  
>>> analysed
>>> as gender marking to actually be speech-participant marking? I've
>>> already demonstrated that your methodology is without linguistic
>>> support, viz. 1) that you eschew any essential phonemic analysis  
>>> which
>>> allows you to basically propose anything you want to as it is  
>>> then up to
>>> the imagination and so is without any constraints; and 2) your
>>> contention -- again without adduced evidence -- that BH has only a
>>> single vowel is linguistically impossible. These two issues lead
>>> ultimately to a fanciful analysis which no one is taking seriously.
>>>
>>> You would do well to read monographs which relate to your above
>>> assertions such as the following:
>>>
>>> Corbett, Greville G. 1991. Gender. Cambridge Textbooks in  
>>> Linguistics.
>>> Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
>>>
>>> Corbett, Greville G. 2000. Number. Cambridge Textbooks in  
>>> Linguistics.
>>> Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
>>>
>>> Siewierska, Anna. 2004. Person. Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics.
>>> Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> David Kummerow.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> b-hebrew mailing list
>>> b-hebrew at lists.ibiblio.org
>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-hebrew
>>>
>



More information about the b-hebrew mailing list