[b-hebrew] [b-Hebrew] YHWH Pronunciation - cholam analysis & Ben Hayim text question

David P Donnelly davedonnelly1 at juno.com
Fri Jul 22 09:15:58 EDT 2005


Peter Kirk said:

>>>
This is interesting, but anomalous, 
as when the Elohim pronunciation is intended the regular pointing 
e.g. in Deuteronomy 3:24, 9:26,  Ezekiel  2:4, 3:11 is with sheva, not
hataf segol. 

But then the hataf segol is not unique to Judges 16:28 
as it is also found in Genesis 15:2,8,  but  apparently nowhere else. 

In fact these are the only cases in the  Hebrew  Bible of hataf segol
under yod.
 
(All of this taken from BHS, assumed  to  be an accurate reflection of
L.)
>>>

Peter,

My reprint of the 1866 Letteris Edition of the Hebrew Bible preserves the
spelling 
[yod-hatef segol-he-holem-vav-hireq-he] 305 times, 
where YHWH follows Adonay.

I assume, but do not know for sure, 
that the same situation exists in the Ben Chayyim Hebrew text of 1525,
which underlies the Old Testament of the King James Bible

Below is a link to a photo from Smith's "A dictionary of the Bible"
published in 1863;
Although first published in 1863, this photo shows how YHWH is pointed 
when YHWH follows Adonay in the 1866 Leteris edition of the Hebrew Bible.

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-7/264290/JehovahSmithsBibleDictionary
.jpg 

Since the photo was first published in 1863,
3 years before the Letteris edition of the Hebrew Bible was published, 
it is at least possible that it showed how YHWH was pointed when YHWH
followed Adonay
in the Ben Chayyim Hebrew Text of 1525.

Dave Donnelly





On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 13:38:40 +0100 Peter Kirk <peterkirk at qaya.org>
writes:
> On 22/07/2005 11:58, David P Donnelly wrote:
> 
> > ...
> >
> >Peter,
> >
> >Why would the Masoretes point YHWH with the vowels  
> shewa-holem-qamets,
> >if they wanted the Hebrew reader to pronounce that spelling 
> "Adonay"?
> >
> >Why wouldn't the Masoretes have pointed YHWH with the vowels hatef
> >patah-holem-qamets,
> >if they were trying to indicate to the Jewish reader he was to 
> read
> >"Adonay" ?
> >  
> >
> 
> One reason might be that hataf patah is never normally found under 
> yod, 
> and physically there is not space to write it there.
> 
> >At Judges 16:28 when YHWH followed Adonay,
> >the Masoretes pointed YHWH with the precise vowels of Elohiym,
> >which included placing the composite shewa, hatef segol under the 
> yod.
> >  
> >
> 
> This is interesting, but anomalous, as when the Elohim pronunciation 
> is 
> intended the regular pointing e.g. in Deuteronomy 3:24, 9:26, 
> Ezekiel 
> 2:4, 3:11 is with sheva, not hataf segol. But then the hataf segol 
> is 
> not unique to Judges 16:28 as it is also found in Genesis 15:2,8, 
> but 
> apparently nowhere else. In fact these are the only cases in the 
> Hebrew 
> Bible of hataf segol under yod. (All of this taken from BHS, assumed 
> to 
> be an accurate reflection of L.)
> 
> Here are some statistics for YHWH pointed as Elohim in the 
> Westminster 
> Leningrad Codex:
> 
> Y:EHWIH - 2 (GEN 15:2,8)
> Y:EHOWIH - 1 (JDG 16:28)
> Y:HWIH - 271
> Y:HOWIH - 31 (1KI 2:26; PSA 73:28; 140:8; ISA 50:4; JER 1:6; 7:20; 
> EZK 
> 2:4; 3:11,27; 5:5; 8:1; 12:10; 13:16; 14:21,23; 16:36; 17:9; 20:39; 
> 
> 21:33; 22:31; 23:32; 24:6,14; 26:21; 28:2; 30:22; 33:25; 39:17; 
> 43:27; 
> 46:16; ZEC 9:14)
> W:L"YHWIH - 1 (PSA 68:21)
> 
> And then for comparison, other cases of YHWH:
> 
> Y:HWFH - 4488
> Forms ending in Y:HWFH - 1187
> Forms ending in YHWFH - 788
> Y:HOWFH - 30 (GEN 3:14; 9:26; EXO 3:2; 13:3,9,15; 14:1,8; LEV 25:17; 
> DEU 
> 32:9; 33:12,13; 1KI 3:5; PSA 15:1; 40:5; 47:6; 100:5; 116:5,6; PRO 
> 1:29; 
> JER 2:37; 3:22,25; 4:3; 5:3,19; 6:9; 36:8; EZK 44:5; NAM 1:3)
> Forms ending in Y:HOWFH - 14 (DEU 31:27; 1KI 16:33; JER 3:1,13,21; 
> 4:8; 
> 5:2,9,15,18,22,29; 8:13; 30:10)
> Forms ending in YHOWFH - 1 (GEN 18:17; EXO 13:12; LEV 23:34; JER 
> 3:23; 
> 4:4; EZK 46:13)
> 
> I also found the following interesting case, which is the only hataf 
> 
> patah under yod in the Hebrew Bible:
> 
> $EY:AHWFH - 1 (PSA 144:15)
> 
> These statistics also put paid to Nehemiah Gordon's argument that 
> the 
> holam is written when the intended pronunciation is Elohim, and 
> omitted 
> only when the pronunciation is Adonay. Gordon, as quoted by Steven 
> Avery, wrote:
> 
> >"only reason the Masoretic scribes would have left the form Yehowih 
> without 
> >dropping the vowel after the hey is because they knew this was not 
> the true 
> >pronunciation of the divine name. ... the Masoretic scribes knew 
> the name to be 
> >Yehovah and suppressed its pronunciation by omitting the "o". This 
> is confirmed 
> >by the fact that the scribes actually forgot to suppress the vowel 
> "o" in a 
> >number of instances."
> >
> 
> But it seems that in the great majority of cases the Masoretic 
> scribes 
> didn't write the holam from Y:HOWIH, as well as in Y:HOWFH. So a 
> different explanation is needed of why the holam is sometimes 
> written 
> and sometimes not.
> 
> >In 1008-1010 A.D. the Masoretes did not seem to recognize any 
> Hebrew
> >grammar rules,
> >that might have prevented them from placing a composite shewa under 
> a
> >yod.
> >
> >  
> >
> I think it might be safer to say that they did have such a rule but 
> that 
> it was not applied 100%, as four exceptions are found in the Hebrew 
> 
> Bible - as listed above, there are none with hataf qamats. Also, in 
> 
> Masoretic times sheva may have been pronounced more like hataf patah 
> 
> than hataf segol, and so the former distinction could be lost 
> without 
> cost but the latter could not. Nevertheless, there are a lot of 
> potentially fascinating details to look at here.
> 
> -- 
> Peter Kirk
> peter at qaya.org (personal)
> peterkirk at qaya.org (work)
> http://www.qaya.org/
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.9.2/55 - Release Date: 
> 21/07/2005
> 
> 
> 


More information about the b-hebrew mailing list