[b-hebrew] Footnotes, was: The translation of ehyeh

Peter Kirk peterkirk at qaya.org
Sun Aug 7 18:05:36 EDT 2005


On 07/08/2005 17:40, Vadim Cherny wrote:

>>It is much better to put the
>>explantory reading in the text, and if necessary add a footnote giving a
>>more literal rendering.
>>
>>    
>>
>
>A dangerous path, indeed. Honestly, it should be called exegesis, not
>translation. Why keep literal rendering from the readers? At the minimum, an
>honest translator must state his preference at the beginning--something
>which I have yet to see--as to the method. ...
>

Most translators, at least of modern English versions, explain their 
translation principles in a preface to their translations.

I am not suggesting keeping the literal rendering from the readers, but 
putting in a footnote where it can be consulted by anyone who is interested.

>... Does he choose statistically most
>common translation? Or, perhaps, a translation justified by the context? Or,
>by the historical perspective? Or, by his exegesis needs? ...
>

Not his or her personal needs of course, but his or her exegesis of the 
text, with a view to the context, the historical perspective etc. It is 
impossible to translate without doing this kind of exegesis.

>... How improbable
>translation he could adopt? Say, if the translation chosen is attested for
>only 10% of the word' entries, does that warrant a footnote of caution? I
>always found it a bit odd: manuals for electric kettles contain all kinds of
>superfluous precautions, but a manual for supposedly the salvation
>translated very vaguely.
>  
>

I have nothing against precautions. But if the text is all precautions 
and no clear instructions, how will you know even how to switch on the 
kettle?

-- 
Peter Kirk
peter at qaya.org (personal)
peterkirk at qaya.org (work)
http://www.qaya.org/




More information about the b-hebrew mailing list