creation and apparatuses (apparati)

Shoshanna Walker rosewalk at concentric.net
Thu Jun 27 15:23:45 EDT 2002



That's not what G-d said



> God finished his work on the 7th day,
> that means he worked on the seventh day.
> The Greek and the Samaritan fix it up and change it to the sixth
> day.
> I only know that from the apparaus at the bottom of the BHS.
>  I bought the BHL and am very disappointed that it doesn't have
> an apparatus. Grrr.
> How is one supposed to know these things? Is there another way
> of finding out the manuscript variants?
> Liz
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Yigal Levin [mailto:Yigal-Levin at utc.edu]
> > Sent: Thu, June 27, 2002 10:02 AM
> > To: Biblical Hebrew
> > Subject: Re: creation
> >
> >
> > Hi Joe,
> >
> > I suggest you read any basic text on the documentary hypothesis of the
> > authorship of the Pentateuch (Torah). I'd suggest R. E. Friedman's Who
> > Wrote the Bible?, which offers the clearest and most interesting
> > introduction to the hypothesis for students. You can also see
> > some of it
> > online at
> > http://www-relg-studies.scu.edu/netcours/rs011/sess08/hisdochp.htm.
> >
> > For the moment, D stands for Deuteronomy, Dtr stands for the
> > Deuteronomistic History (Joshua-Kings) which seems to have
> > been written by
> > an author or authors directly influenced by D (maybe even the
> > same one who
> > wrote D).
> >
> > P stands for the Priestly Source, that is those parts of the
> > Torah that
> > were probably written by the priests (kohanim) in the Temple,
> > including
> > most of the laws and narrative in Leviticus and Numbers. Most
> > scholars also
> > assume that the "first version" of the creation story (Gen.
> > 1-2:4) is also
> > part of P.
> >
> > According to most scholars, D was either written or
> > "rediscovered" during
> > the time of King Josiah (about 620 BCE), and Dtr was written under its
> > influence and completed during the exile.
> >
> > Most scholars assume that P is either exilic or post-exilic, "throwing
> > back" the laws of the Second Temple to Moses, although some
> > think that it
> > is earlier. If this is correct, then the D version of the Ten
> > Commandments
> > is actually earlier than the written form of the P creation
> > story and maybe
> > of the Exodus version of the Ten Commandments as well.
> >
> > As far as 6 or 7 days, you are correct, it is 6+ the Sabbath.
> >
> > Yigal
> >
> > At 06:11 PM 6/26/2002 -0400, VALEDICTION wrote:
> > >Hi Yigal...
> > >Just so I can follow this discussion (sounds interesting) I
> > need to know
> > >what your abbreviations stand for (i.e., D, Dtr, and P)??
> > (Sorry, I'm a
> > >novice.)
> > >
> > >Also, you say 7-day creation but don't you mean 6-day
> > creation?  I think all
> > >would agree that no "melachah" (creative work) took place on day 7...
> > >
> > >Joe Glean --junior member--
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >----- Original Message -----
> > >From: "Yigal Levin" <Yigal-Levin at utc.edu>
> > >Sent: Wednesday, June 26, 2002 4:20 PM
> > >
> > >> Does the D version of the Fourth Commandment (Sabbath) deny a 7-day
> > >> creation? Does D or even Dtr anywhere display an awareness of the P
> > >> creation story?
> > >>
> > >> Dr. Yigal Levin
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > Dr. Yigal Levin
> > Dept. of Philosophy and Religion
> > University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
> > 615 McCallie Avenue
> > Chattanooga TN 37403-2598
> > U.S.A.
> >
> > ---
> > You are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: [lizfried at umich.edu]
> > To unsubscribe, forward this message to
> > $subst('Email.Unsub')
> > To subscribe, send an email to join-b-hebrew at franklin.oit.unc.edu.
>
>
>
> ---
> You are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: [rosewalk at concentric.net]
> To unsubscribe, forward this message to
$subst('Email.Unsub')
> To subscribe, send an email to join-b-hebrew at franklin.oit.unc.edu.
>
>
>




More information about the b-hebrew mailing list