creation and apparatuses (apparati)

Lisbeth S. Fried lizfried at umich.edu
Thu Jun 27 15:02:11 EDT 2002


God finished his work on the 7th day,
that means he worked on the seventh day.
The Greek and the Samaritan fix it up and change it to the sixth
day.
I only know that from the apparaus at the bottom of the BHS.
 I bought the BHL and am very disappointed that it doesn't have
an apparatus. Grrr.
How is one supposed to know these things? Is there another way
of finding out the manuscript variants?
Liz

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Yigal Levin [mailto:Yigal-Levin at utc.edu]
> Sent: Thu, June 27, 2002 10:02 AM
> To: Biblical Hebrew
> Subject: Re: creation
>
>
> Hi Joe,
>
> I suggest you read any basic text on the documentary hypothesis of the
> authorship of the Pentateuch (Torah). I'd suggest R. E. Friedman's Who
> Wrote the Bible?, which offers the clearest and most interesting
> introduction to the hypothesis for students. You can also see
> some of it
> online at
> http://www-relg-studies.scu.edu/netcours/rs011/sess08/hisdochp.htm.
>
> For the moment, D stands for Deuteronomy, Dtr stands for the
> Deuteronomistic History (Joshua-Kings) which seems to have
> been written by
> an author or authors directly influenced by D (maybe even the
> same one who
> wrote D).
>
> P stands for the Priestly Source, that is those parts of the
> Torah that
> were probably written by the priests (kohanim) in the Temple,
> including
> most of the laws and narrative in Leviticus and Numbers. Most
> scholars also
> assume that the "first version" of the creation story (Gen.
> 1-2:4) is also
> part of P.
>
> According to most scholars, D was either written or
> "rediscovered" during
> the time of King Josiah (about 620 BCE), and Dtr was written under its
> influence and completed during the exile.
>
> Most scholars assume that P is either exilic or post-exilic, "throwing
> back" the laws of the Second Temple to Moses, although some
> think that it
> is earlier. If this is correct, then the D version of the Ten
> Commandments
> is actually earlier than the written form of the P creation
> story and maybe
> of the Exodus version of the Ten Commandments as well.
>
> As far as 6 or 7 days, you are correct, it is 6+ the Sabbath.
>
> Yigal
>
> At 06:11 PM 6/26/2002 -0400, VALEDICTION wrote:
> >Hi Yigal...
> >Just so I can follow this discussion (sounds interesting) I
> need to know
> >what your abbreviations stand for (i.e., D, Dtr, and P)??
> (Sorry, I'm a
> >novice.)
> >
> >Also, you say 7-day creation but don't you mean 6-day
> creation?  I think all
> >would agree that no "melachah" (creative work) took place on day 7...
> >
> >Joe Glean --junior member--
> >
> >
> >
> >----- Original Message -----
> >From: "Yigal Levin" <Yigal-Levin at utc.edu>
> >Sent: Wednesday, June 26, 2002 4:20 PM
> >
> >> Does the D version of the Fourth Commandment (Sabbath) deny a 7-day
> >> creation? Does D or even Dtr anywhere display an awareness of the P
> >> creation story?
> >>
> >> Dr. Yigal Levin
> >
> >
> >
> Dr. Yigal Levin
> Dept. of Philosophy and Religion
> University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
> 615 McCallie Avenue
> Chattanooga TN 37403-2598
> U.S.A.
>
> ---
> You are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: [lizfried at umich.edu]
> To unsubscribe, forward this message to
> $subst('Email.Unsub')
> To subscribe, send an email to join-b-hebrew at franklin.oit.unc.edu.





More information about the b-hebrew mailing list