Aleppo vs. Leningrad Codex

Yigal Levin Yigal-Levin at utc.edu
Mon Jun 24 15:16:22 EDT 2002


Someone here asked about the Israeli Koren edition. It was first printed in
1962, and is based on a variety of Masoretic sources. Its major claim to
fame is actually in its printed letter form (what computer people call its
"font"), which is much easier to read than any previous Hebrew print. 

Several other Israeli Bibles used the Leningrad text as a base. In recent
years, both the Rabbi Kook institute in Jerusalem and Bar Ilan University
have been working on Bibles based on the Aleppo (or "Aram Zobah", as it's
called in Hebrew) codex.

At 06:37 PM 6/24/2002 +0100, Maurice A. O'Sullivan wrote:
>At 13:28 24/06/02, Madden, Shawn wrote:
>
>>Most good theological libraries will have reproduction copies of both 
>>Aleppo & Leningrad.
>
>A caveat: the CBQ review I quoted in my previous posting has this to say on 
>the use of the Leningrad facsimile edition.
>
> >>> The improved readings of the Dotan edition reflect the judgement of 
>the editor. The naive user may find the facsimile of the Leningrad 
>adequate, but in fact the manuscript itself is sometimes " insufficiently 
>clear on account of defacement, spots, lacunae, and fading that have 
>affected it over time, as a result of much handling, or on account of 
>mistakes of the scribe and slips of the pen " (page xi). Further, the 
>photographs are not entirely trustworthy: the Zuckerman photographs, which 
>" penetrate deep under the surface of the parchment and catch the embedded 
>ink " (page xii) sometimes makes a correction to the text recede behind a 
>reading that the scribe rejected. D. provides variant readings in Appendix 
>A; the presence of a variant is  signaled in the margin of the text with a 
>small-cap A. <<<
>
>
>
>
>
>Maurice A. O'Sullivan  [ Bray, Ireland ]
>mauros at iol.ie
>
>
>
>
>---
>You are currently subscribed to b-hebrew as: [Yigal-Levin at utc.edu]
>To unsubscribe, forward this message to
$subst('Email.Unsub')
>To subscribe, send an email to join-b-hebrew at franklin.oit.unc.edu.
>
>
Dr. Yigal Levin
Dept. of Philosophy and Religion
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
615 McCallie Avenue
Chattanooga TN 37403-2598
U.S.A.



More information about the b-hebrew mailing list