[B-Greek] 1Thesalonians5:23

Carl Conrad cwconrad2 at mac.com
Fri Jun 3 06:58:02 EDT 2011


On Jun 3, 2011, at 5:43 AM, =) <p1234567891 at gmail.com> wrote:

> Dear all,
> 
> 
> Can I also ask about the last part of
> [1 Thes 5:23]
> αυτος δε ο θεος της ειρηνης αγιασαι υμας ολοτελεις και ολοκληρον υμων
> τοπνευμακαιηψυχηκαιτοσωμααμεμπτως
> εν τη παρουσια του κυριου ημων ιησου χριστου τηρηθειη
> AUTOS DE O QEOS THS EIRHNHS AGIASAI UMAS OLOTELEIS KAI OLOKLHRON UMWN TO
> PNEUMA KAI H YUCH KAI TO SWMA AMEMPTWS EN TH PAROUSIA TOU KURIOU HMWN IHSOU
> CRISTOU THRHQEIH
> moreover may the God of the peace himself sanctify you completely. and may
> your entire spirit and [your] [entire] soul and [your] [entire] body be kept
> faultless in the presence of our lord, Jesus Christ.
> 
> I understood "EN TH PAROUSIA" to mean "in the presence", because although I
> know that it can imply "arrival" in some instances, it seems to have a main
> connotation of "presence" rather than "coming" (just as when we say "he is
> finally present" to mean "he has arrived"). Phlp 2:12 has "EN TH PAROUSIA
> MOU ... EN TH APOUSIA MOU" which means "in my presence ... in my absence". Is
> there then reason to take this phrase to mean specifically "in the arrival"?
> Does "EN TH PAROUSIA TOU KURIOU HMWN IHSOU CRISTOU" convey more of "in the
> presence of our lord Jesus Christ", whether it is the result of "his
> coming"?

Yes, in Phil 2:12 the sense of παρουσία PAROUSIA clearly is "presence,"
but this appears to be the only instance among the 24 in the GNT of the
word where it does in fact mean "being present" rather than "arrival."
The central theme of 1 Thess is the expectation of the "coming" of the
Lord and the behavior of the Thessalonian congregation as a consequence
of their expectation of its imminence. Several words in the passage also
suggest that the optatives signaling Paul's petitions here involve the
peril of loss of integrity of body or spirit in the course of calamitous
events: hOLOTELEIS, hOLOKLHRON, AMEMPTWS -- and the very
presence of the verb THRHQEIH itself points in the same direction.
The whole context points to preservation of integrity of selfhood at a
critical point in time.

Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)





More information about the B-Greek mailing list