[B-Greek] Where does the NU in ἡμῖν hHMIN come from?

Carl Conrad cwconrad2 at mac.com
Mon Aug 16 14:30:29 EDT 2010


On Aug 16, 2010, at 2:10 PM, Mark Lightman wrote:

> <Actually, not quite so different as you might think, but with a twist.
> Sihler thinks that the inherited nu in the pronominal dative plurals
> is  an analogical source for the moveable-nu in the dative plural forms
> (and  then extended to the third person plural verb forms, etc.).>
> 
> That theory strikes me as not only plausible but even a little helpful for 
> beginners trying to make sense of this present darkness. 

Ah yes! hWS GAR EFH hO APOSTOLOS, Eph. 6:12 ὅτι οὐκ ἔστιν ἡμῖν ἡ πάλη πρὸς αἷμα καὶ σάρκα ἀλλὰ πρὸς τὰς ἀρχάς, πρὸς τὰς ἐξουσίας, πρὸς τοὺς κοσμοκράτορας τοῦ σκότους τούτου, πρὸς τὰ πνευματικὰ τῆς πονηρίας ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις. [hOTI OUK ESTIN hHMIN hH PALH PROS hAIMA KAI SARKA ALLA PROS TAS ARCAS, PROS TAS EXOUSIAS, PROS TOUS KOSMOKRATORAS TOU SKOTOUS TOUTOU, PROS TA PNEUMATIKA THS PONHRIAS EN TOIS EPOURANIOIS.]

Well, I do remember Aeolic dative plurals in I(N): AMMI(N) (= hHMIN), UMMI(N) 9= hUMIN, and then there are the dual forms nom/acc. NWI ('we two") dat/acc NWIN, nom/acc. SFW, dat/acc. SFWIN. Cf. Smyth §325d. What I always wondered about was the long iota in hUMIN and hHMIN, inasmuch as the iota of the dative plural is everywhere else short. Blame it on the KOSMOKRATORES TOU SKOTOUS TOUTOU.

Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)

> ________________________________
> From: Stephen Carlson <stemmatic at gmail.com>
> To: Mark Lightman <lightmanmark at yahoo.com>
> Cc: b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org
> Sent: Mon, August 16, 2010 12:04:36 PM
> Subject: Re: [B-Greek] Where does the NU in ἡμῖν hHMIN come from?
> 
> On Mon, Aug 16, 2010 at 1:29 PM, Mark Lightman <lightmanmark at yahoo.com> wrote:
>> But it sounds like Sihler is saying something different.
> 
> Actually, not quite so different as you might think, but with a twist.
> Sihler thinks that the inherited nu in the pronominal dative plurals
> is an analogical source for the moveable-nu in the dative plural forms
> (and then extented to the third person plural verb forms, etc.).
> 
> Stephen Carlson
> -- 
> Stephen C. Carlson
> Graduate Program in Religion
> Duke University







More information about the B-Greek mailing list