[B-Greek] Rev 14:13 AP ARTI

Iver Larsen iver_larsen at sil.org
Wed Aug 4 03:41:09 EDT 2010


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Oun Kwon" <kwonbbl at gmail.com>
To: "John Sanders" <john.franklin.sanders at gmail.com>
Cc: "B-Greek" <b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: 4. august 2010 00:19
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] Rev 14:13 AP ARTI


> Thanks John for your thought.
>
> By parenthetical, I meant to use it in terms of sentence structure.
> That way, I can effectively disconnect AP' ARTI from APOQNHSKONTES ;-)
>
>
> Of course, thematically it is important and essential. It almost comes
> to me something like another group in a chorus chiming in.
>
> If I take a script writer's license to put it into a responsive reading:
>
> Group I: "Blessed are the dead"
>
> Group 2: "the ones who die in the Lord!"
>
> Group 1 & 2 (in place of the Spirit): "From now on, yes, they may rest
> from their toil for what they have done surely will follow on after
> them."
>
>
> It simply does not make any sense to have John say 'those dying from
> now on'.   What would it mean by 'now'? How about those already died
> (as martyrs)? etc.
>
> Even if I break the sentence after the phrase AP'  ARTI, I believe
> this phrase is better off when paired with MAKARIOI.  Same as you put
> it.
>
> My choice is to break the sentence after  APOQNHSKONTE, so that AP'
> ARTI goes kataphorically (as DRB renders). What I am worried is
> whether the Greek word/phrase order is natural with NAI to follow.
>
> Oun Kwon.

Yes, I would be worried, too. NAI cannot follow AP' ARTI. The rendering by the 
Douay-Rheims version (And I heard a voice from heaven, saying to me: Write: 
Blessed are the dead, who die in the Lord. From henceforth now, saith the 
Spirit, that they may rest from their labours) is caused by translating word for 
word from the Vulgate:
et audivi vocem de caelo dicentem
scribe beati mortui qui in Domino moriuntur
amodo iam dicit Spiritus ut requiescant a laboribus suis

The amodo (henceforth) could go either way, I suppose. DR also follows the 
Vulgate in saying "now (iam)". It looks like amodo iam translates AP' ARTI. I 
don't know what they did with NAI, but it is not a simple matter to say "yes" in 
Latin, I think. (I don't know Latin well.)

The Greek text is:
Καὶ ἤκουσα φωνῆς ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ λεγούσης, Γράψον· Μακάριοι οἱ νεκροὶ οἱ ἐν κυρίῳ 
ἀποθνῄσκοντες ἀπ᾽ ἄρτι. ναί, λέγει τὸ πνεῦμα, ἵνα ἀναπαήσονται ἐκ τῶν κόπων 
αὐτῶν.

KAI HKOUSA FWNHS EK TOU OURANOU LEGOUSHS, GRAFON: MAKARIOI hOI NEKROI hOI EN 
KURIWi APOQNHSKONTES AP' ARTI. NAI, LEGEI TO PNEUMA, hINA ANAPAHSONTAI EK TWN 
KOPWN AUTWN
(And I heard a voice from heaven saying, Write: Those who die in the Lord from 
now on are in a good position. "Yes/indeed," says the Spirit, "so that they can 
enjoy a rest/release from their troubles.")

The context indicates that at this particular time it is better for a believer 
to die than to go through extremely difficult troubles. After all, if you die in 
the Lord, you can look forward to a better life, and death is a release from 
troubles.

Iver Larsen




More information about the B-Greek mailing list