[B-Greek] referential complexity: frames & scenarios and Galatians 6:18

yancywsmith at sbcglobal.net yancywsmith at sbcglobal.net
Sun Apr 25 10:39:30 EDT 2010


Randall EGRAYE:
> Students will be better
> off, more on-target and in-the-ball-park, working from multiple English
> translations done by qualified, skilled translators. And with a little
> training in order to appreciate the various translations vis-a-vis
> 'wooden glosses'.
> 
> Personally, I don't see any other route than to learn Greek well if
> someone wants to be a skilled, lifelong, interpreter of ancient
> Greek literature and the NT in particular.
> 
> If you love Cervantes, learn Spanish fluently. If you love Schiller,
> learn German fluently. If you love the Bard, learn English fluently.
> If you love Jesus, learn Greek fluently (Hebrew fluently too).
> And learn analytical tools in parallel to the language skills.


I couldn't agree more. Since I work as a consultant in BT, people often ask me, "What is the best translation"? My first response is always, "The Bible translation you actually want to read." But when pressed, I say, "Pick three or four translations: your favorite and three others with approaches different from your own." If you like a paraphrase, pick a literal translation, If you are a Protestant, pick a Roman Catholic translation or if you are a Christian, pick a Jewish translation for the OT. The value of using a variety of translations with distinct approaches is the potential it creates for questioning the ruts we tend to get into when studying the Bible.

For Greek in NT exegesis (as well as linguistics) Pope's quote is a great rule of thumb:

A little learning is a dangerous thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring;
There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.
 
Yancy Smith, PhD
yancywsmith at sbcglobal.net
Y.W.Smith at tcu.edu
yancy at wbtc.com
5636 Wedgworth Road
Fort Worth, TX 76133
817-361-7565






On Apr 25, 2010, at 4:11 AM, Randall Buth wrote:

> Students will be better
> off, more on-target and in-the-ball-park, working from multiple English
> translations done by qualified, skilled translators. And with a little
> training in order to appreciate the various translations vis-a-vis
> 'wooden glosses'.
> 
> Personally, I don't see any other route than to learn Greek well if
> someone wants to be a skilled, lifelong, interpreter of ancient
> Greek literature and the NT in particular.
> 
> If you love Cervantes, learn Spanish fluently. If you love Schiller,
> learn German fluently. If you love the Bard, learn English fluently.
> If you love Jesus, learn Greek fluently (Hebrew fluently too).
> And learn analytical tools in parallel to the language skills.




More information about the B-Greek mailing list