[B-Greek] A Semantic Frame in II Cor. 4 (was PERIFRONTES in 2 Cor 4:10 (or, prepositions and, compounds)

Blue Meeksbay bluemeeksbay at yahoo.com
Sat Apr 24 19:35:37 EDT 2010


I wonder if perhaps there might be another semantic frame, (that is, if, as Paul Toseland also stated, I am understanding the term correctly. I am like Mark. If I had another forty years on this earth I would love to learn everything Elizabeth, Yancy and Don have been discussing, but since I do not believe I have that many years, I am more inclined to try to increase my fluency). (By the way Mark, I love your posts. I do not think they need to be shorter, but, indeed should be longer!). (Oh, and BTW, I like my mayonnaise on tomatoes.)
 
In any case, if we loosely connect the participles in verses 8-10a with KHRUSSOMENin verse 5, I could see your point about a procession, (in this case, verse 6 and 7 may be a parenthesis). However, if we loosely connect them with PARADIDOMEQA in verse 11, I think we come up with a different frame.
 
Some months ago when we were discussing II Cor. 3, I mentioned that I thought Paul was revealing to us that the later practice of *carrying about* the Torah Scroll in the synagogue service might , indeed,  have been a first century practice, and may have been what he was referring to in II Cor. 3: 14-15.  Those who held to the Old Covenant *carried* about the symbol of the Old Covenant, the Torah scroll against their breasts or hearts. 
 
Perhaps what Paul is referring to in the passage before us is that as servants of the New Covenant, they are not *carrying about* the old symbol – Moses, symbolized by the Torah Scroll,  but are *carrying about* in their own body the symbol of the New Covenant – the death of Jesus, symbolized by the cross. In other words, they are not carrying about a Torah Scroll, but they are carrying about a cross!
 
Since Paul uses PARADIDOMEQA in verse 11, perhaps he is giving us a frame not of a procession through pagan streets, but a procession through the streets of Jerusalem – the *carrying* of the cross by Jesus to his crucifixion, the one who was *delivered* up to die. 
 
LEGWN TON hUION TOU ANQRWPOU hOTI DEI  *PARADOQHNAI*  EIS CEIRAS ANQRWPWN hAMARTWLWN KAI STAURWQHNAI KAI THi TRITHi hHMERAi ANASTHNAI.  Luke 24:7
 
If I understand the term “semantic frame” correctly, (and I am sure I will be told if I do not), the word  PARADIDOMEQA would be the *activating* word  that invokes the imagery of the passion of Christ. 
 
In other words, Paul is saying, as his servants we are to “take up our cross, deny our self, and follow in his footsteps (Matt. 16:24). Carrying about the death of Jesus in his body was another way of saying he was always being put into situations where he was delivered up to die, both figuratively and literally. 
 
Carl’s comparison to Phil 3 also gives us this imagery, especially when Paul says,the following in Phil. 3:10-11. TOU GNWNAI AUTON KAI THN DUNAMIN THS ANASTASEWS AUTOU KAI THN KOINWNIAN TWN PAQHMATWN AUTOU, SUMMORFIZOMENOS TWi QANATWi AUTOU, EI PWS KATANTHSW EIS THN EXANASTASIN THN EK NEKRWN.
 
Anyway, this was just a thought.  Here is another thought. Does one frame necessarily exclude the other? Could not Paul be intending to give the hearer or reader both imageries – the imagery of II Cor. 2:14 activated byQRIAMBEUONTI and the imagery of II Cor. 3:11 activated by PARADIDOMEQA? 
 
Sincerely,
Blue Harris
 




________________________________
From: Alex Poulos <apviper at gmail.com>
To: Paul Toseland <paul at weakamongtheweak.org>; cwconrad2 at mac.com
Cc: b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org
Sent: Sat, April 24, 2010 12:32:47 PM
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] PERIFRONTES in 2 Cor 4:10 (or, prepositions and, compounds)

Thanks Paul for the references.  Those will be quite helpful.

And Conrad, thanks for the note as well.  The parallel to περιπατεω is
helpful.  I hadn't thought of "carry around."  Philippians 3 actually forms
a important link in my argument, so I'm glad you saw the connection between
those passages too.

Alex Poulos
Junior - Computer Science
NC State University

On Sat, Apr 24, 2010 at 12:44 PM, Paul Toseland
<paul at weakamongtheweak.org>wrote:

> Alex,
>
> Paul likely chose the verb PERIFERW because he is working with the imagery
> of Greco-Roman epiphany processions (if I rightly understand Elizabeth, he
> is using this semantic frame). In such processions, an image of the deity,
> or other holy objects that were believed to mediate the presence of the
> deity, were carried around (PERIFERW) as the procession made its way to the
> deity's temple. In this case, the object that manifests the presence of the
> deity - the crucified Christ - is Paul's body. As he is led by God in
> triumphal procession (2:14 - understood here as an epiphany procession),
> enduring the extreme afflictions of his his apostolic ministry (vv. 7-9; cf.
> 2:15-16a), his sufferings make visible the message he preaches. See in
> particular,
>
> Paul B. Duff, '/2 Corinthians 1-7: Sidestepping the Division Hypothesis
> Dilemma/. BTB 24 (1994) 16-26';
>
> also, by the same author,
>
> * '/The Transformation of the Spectator: Power, Perception and the Day of
> Salvation/, SBLSP 26 (1987) pp 233-43';
> * '/Metaphor, Motif and Meaning: The Rhetorical Strategy Behind the Image
> "Led in Triumph" in 2 Corinthians 2:14,'/ CBQ 53 (1991) 79-92;
> * '/Mind of the Redactor: 2 Cor.  6:14-7:1 in its Secondary Context/,' NovT
> 35 (1993) 160-80.
>
> Best wishes,
> Paul Toseland
>
> --
> Dr. Paul Toseland
> Scarborough, UK
> "It ain't what you don't know that hurts you.  It's what you THINK you
> know, but it ain't so."--Mark Twain
>
>
>
>
---
B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
B-Greek mailing list
B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek



      


More information about the B-Greek mailing list