[B-Greek] Con Campbell on Interlinears

Ken Penner kpenner at stfx.ca
Wed Oct 7 09:14:07 EDT 2009


The most appropriate exercise depends on your level of proficiency, but there's no substitute for spending the time. A Reader's Greek New Testament (Zondervan or UBS) would be appropriate for a beginner, and can still be used by those with more proficiency. In my view, it's best to combine breadth with depth. Sometimes read a lot quickly, at other times slow down and investigate.

Ken


 
-----Original Message-----
From: b-greek-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org [mailto:b-greek-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of Martin F. Daly
Sent: October 7, 2009 10:05 AM
Cc: B-Greek
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] Con Campbell on Interlinears

I'll risk another post and humbly ask again, "How do you, personally,  
build and maintain your Greek reading and comprehension?"
I don't know enough to disdain interlinears, but I know daily exercise 
is important and using "cheats" cuts down on the intensity of the 
exercise. So I'm asking for the sake of beginners like me what are some 
of the daily Greek exercise routines that can bring gains without 
"pulling a muscle?"

En Xapiti,
--- marty ---

Carl Conrad wrote:
> That old curmudgeon Clay Bartholomew once described his posts to B- 
> Greek as Molotov cocktails stealthily-tossed into the public square to  
> create a stir. Things have been relatively quiet on B-Greek for a day  
> or so, wherefore it seems worth noting that Con Campbell, about whose  
> "Basics of Biblical Greek Verbal Aspect" I have raised some questions  
> heretofore, has posted a nice remark about interlinears in a blog post  
> at:
> http://readbetterpreachbetter.com/2009/10/06/keep-your-greek-testing-some-lines/
> = http://turl.ca/tkkf
>
> Says Professor Campbell:
>
> "Just as performing bicep curls without using your biceps is  
> counterproductive and lame, so too is reading Greek without using your  
> Greek.
>
> "Instead of using the primary ‘muscle group’ needed to read Greek—your  
> memory!—the interlinear allows you to underwork your memory and rely  
> on the stronger ‘muscle group’—the printed English vocabulary sitting  
> right there under each Greek word.
>
> "So, go ahead and burn that interlinear. Or, at least, give it to  
> someone you don’t like very much."
>
> Of course, there is hardly any danger that we shall be seeing a  
> bonfire of the interlinears in the near or distant future; things like  
> that have a long lifespan.
>
> Carl W. Conrad
> Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
>
>
>
> ---
> B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
> B-Greek mailing list
> B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek
>
>   

---
B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
B-Greek mailing list
B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek



More information about the B-Greek mailing list