[B-Greek] hESTHKA and KAQIZW as "I am" (was "hESTWTA" (Acts 7:55 + 56))

Mark Lightman lightmanmark at yahoo.com
Thu May 14 08:34:48 EDT 2009


An example of where ISTNMI in the perfect probably means
"I am:" Mt. 12:47 hH MHTHR KAI hOI ADELFOI AUTOU
hEISTEKEISAN hEXW ("Your mother and brothers are
standing (=are) outside."  Some of the family may have
been sitting at the time.)  An example of where KAQIZW
probably means "I am: "Acts 18:11 EKAQISEN DE ENIAUTON
KAI MHNAS hEX DIDASKWN EN AUTOIS TON LOGON
TOU THEOU ("[Paul] sat (=was) among them a year and six
months teaching the word of God."  He did not stay seated
the whole time.)  KAQIZW is probably influenced by
Hebrew YASHAV which means "I sit" or "I dwell."
 
What Bauer says of hISTHMI in the perfect applies to
verbs of sitting as well "Very often the emphasis is 
less on 'standing' than on being, existing." (II.2.b.)
 
Compare this passage, Acts 7:55 and  Mk. 16:11 
(KAI EKAQISEN EK DEXIWN TOU QEOU) "And [Jesus] 
sat down (=was) at the right hand of God.")  I think
 "standing at the right hand" and "sitting at the right hand" are just
two indiscriminately pleonastic ways of saying "at the right hand,"
and, for that matter, "at the right hand" is just a pleonastic way
of saying "with."  But you know all this,  don't you, Iver, so
I'm not sure why you asked for examples.  You do a much
better job at this than I do.
 
I think this was A. J.'s original question, whether standing here
necessarily literally means standing.  Randall's point about the
difficulties of ISTNMI for beginners is right on point, though.  HERE'S
A WARINING TO PEOPLE JUST STARTING TO LEARN 
NT GREEK.  Pay attention when your grammar tells you 
that ISTNMI does not just mean "I stand", but means " I cause to
stand" or "I set," except  in the second aorist, passive, perfect,
and middle, where it means "I have been caused to stand and
therefore I stand or I am situated or I am."  The problem is that this
is a lot of information for beginners to take in.  You are told this at the
same time when you are still in a daze from having to learn 
MI verbs.  You are told to distinguish between the first and
second aorists of ISTNMI even though you are not really all that
clear about what a second aorist is, and even though the
ISTHMI paradigms of the first and second aorist look very,
 similar and in fact are the same in the third person plural, and even
though it is better to call hESTHN a third aorist.)
 
It's tempting to gloss over this distinction, as I did the first
ten times I read it, but make sure you are clear about it,
and Randall is right, don't gloss ISTNMI with "stand."
 
 
Mark L. 

--- On Wed, 5/13/09, Iver Larsen <iver_larsen at sil.org> wrote:


From: Iver Larsen <iver_larsen at sil.org>
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] "hESTWTA" (Acts 7:55 + 56)
To: "Mark Lightman" <lightmanmark at yahoo.com>, "B-Greek" <b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org>
Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 11:42 AM



No. hISTHMI in the perfect can mean "I am situated" or
really "I am." Same with KAQHMAI/KAQIZW, so that,
depending on the context, "standing at the right hand of
God" and "sitting at the right hand of God" can mean the
same thing...

Mark L. --------------------------------------------

Do you have any evidence for this claim? Any examples?

Iver Larsen




      


More information about the B-Greek mailing list