[B-Greek] Episunagoge

George F Somsel gfsomsel at yahoo.com
Fri May 16 21:02:39 EDT 2008


Agreed, and here is the text 
 ὡς δὲ ὁ Ιερεμιας ἔγνω, μεμψάμενος αὐτοῖς εἶπεν ὅτι Καὶ ἄγνωστος ὁ τόπος ἔσται, ἕως ἂν συναγάγῃ ὁ θεὸς ἐπισυναγωγὴν τοῦ λαοῦ καὶ ἵλεως γένηται, 
hWS DE hO IEREMIAS EGNW, MEMYAMENOS AUTOIS EIPEN hOTI "KAI AGNWSTOS hO TOPOS ESTAI, hEWS AN SUNAGAGHi hO QEOS EPISUNAGWGHN TOU LAOU KAI hILEWS GENHTAI
Another matter which should not be omitted 
 
(32)     ἐπισυναγωγή, found only in 2 Macc. 2:7, 2 Thess. 2:1, and Heb. 10:25, where it denotes various senses of the word “assembly,” is according to Cremer “unknown in profane Greek.” As συναγωγήitself was originally a profane word, one [Page 102] is inclined to ask why ἐπισυναγωγήshould be different, especially as the profane συναγωγήbecame among the Jews (and occasionally among the Christians) the technical expression for the (assembled) congregation and the house in which they met. As a matter of fact a mere statistical accident was the cause of error here, and a second accident has very happily corrected the first. In the island of Syme, off the coast of Caria, there was lately discovered, built into the altar of the chapel of St. Michael Tharrinos, the upper portion of a stele inscribed with a decree in honour of a deserving citizen. The writing is considered to be not later than 100
 b.c., so that the inscription is probably older than the Second Book of Maccabees. By the kind permission of the Imperial Austrian Archaeological Institute I am able to reproduce here (Figure 8) a facsimile of the whole stele (including the portion previously discovered).
On the upper fragment of this stele we find our word in the general meaning of “collection”; the difference between it and the common συναγωγήis scarcely greater than between, say, the English “collecting” and “collecting together”: the longer Greek word was probably more to the taste of the later period. 
The stone which has established the secular character of this Bible word—the heathen stone of Syme built into the altar of the Christian chapel of [Page 103] St. Michael—may be taken as symbolical. It will remind us that in the vocabulary of our sacred Book there is embedded material derived from the language of the surrounding world.
Even without the stone we could have learnt the special lesson, for the Thesaurus Graecae Linguaehad already registered the word in the geographer Ptolemy and in the title of the third book of Artemidorus, the interpreter of dreams, both of the 2nd century a.d., and later in Proclus. Such “post-Christian” “late” passages, however, generally fail to impress the followers of Cremer’s method, and therefore the pre-Christian, and (if importance be attached to the book) pre-Maccabean inscription is very welcome.
Deissmann, A., & Strachan, L. R. M. (1910). Light from the ancient East the New Testament illustrated by recently discovered texts of the Graeco-Roman world (101-02). London: Hodder & Stoughton.
Deissman has an image or the stele.  A shorter reference to Deissmann's discovery is found in Moulton & Milligan, _Vocabulary of the Greek Testament_

 george
gfsomsel


… search for truth, hear truth, 
learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth, 
defend the truth till death.


- Jan Hus
_________



----- Original Message ----
From: Albert Pietersma <albert.pietersma at sympatico.ca>
To: George F Somsel <gfsomsel at yahoo.com>
Cc: Steven Shannon <stevenmarshallshannon at gmail.com>; b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org
Sent: Friday, May 16, 2008 8:45:12 PM
Subject: Re: [B-Greek] Episunagoge

For anyone interested in the concept of EPISUNAGWGH it would be  
prudent to look at the use of EPISUNAGW in the LXX. While the noun  
occurs only in 2 Macc 2:7, the verb has much wider currency.
Al

On May 16, 2008, at 7:03 PM, George F Somsel wrote:

> It's always best to include the text under discussion.
>  μὴ ἐγκαταλείποντες τὴν  
> ἐπισυναγωγὴν ἑαυτῶν, καθὼς ἔθος  
> τισίν, ἀλλὰ παρακαλοῦντες, καὶ  
> τοσούτῳ μᾶλλον ὅσῳ βλέπετε  
> ἐγγίζουσαν τὴν ἡμέραν.
> MH EGKATALEIPONTES THN EPISUNAGWGHN hEAUTWN, KAQWS EQOS TISIN, ALLA  
> PARAKALOUNTES, KAI TOSOUTWi MALLON hOSWi BLEPETE EGGIZOUSAN THN  
> hHMERAN.
> It seems obvious that τὴν ἐπισυναγωγὴν  
> ἑαυτῶν [THN EPISUNAGWGHN hAUTWN] CANNOT reference the time  
> of Christ's coming since it is conceived as something yet to happen  
> whereas here he references it as καθὼς ἔθος τισίν  
> [EQOS TISIN], i.e. as something which is even then taking place at  
> the time he is writing.  It does seem that he is referring to the  
> coming of Christ when he says ἐγγίζουσαν τὴν  
> ἡμέραν [EGGIZOUSAN THN hHMERAN].  There are a few references  
> to ἡμέρα [hHMERA] in Hebrews.
> 1.  3.8 "the day" of testing in the wilderness
> 2.  5.7 "the day" of Christ's life on earth
> 3.  8.8 "the day" when God institutes a new covenant with Israel
> 4.  8.9 "the day" when God led Israel from Egypt
> 5.  The current passage
> None of the other passages seem to carry such an implication.  We  
> do find something in Amos which is referenced in 2 Peter 3.10
>
> 18    Alas for you who desire the day of the Lord!
> Why do you want the day of the Lord?
> It is darkness, not light;
> 19    as if someone fled from a lion,
> and was met by a bear;
> or went into the house and rested a hand against the wall,
> and was bitten by a snake.
> 20    Is not the day of the Lorddarkness, not light,
> and gloom with no brightness in it?
> The Holy Bible : New Revised Standard Version. 1989 (Am 5:18-20).  
> Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers.
> οἱ δὲ νῦν οὐρανοὶ καὶ ἡ γῆ τῷ  
> αὐτῷ λόγῳ τεθησαυρισμένοι εἰσὶν  
> πυρὶ τηρούμενοι εἰς ἡμέραν κρίσεως  
> καὶ ἀπωλείας τῶν ἀσεβῶν ἀνθρώπων.
> hOI DE NUN OURANOI KAI hH GH TWi AUTWi LOGWi TEQHSAURISMENOI EISN  
> PURI THROUMENOI EIS hHMERAN KRISEW KAI APWLEIAS TWN ASEBWN ANQRWPWN  
> george
> gfsomsel
>
>
> … search for truth, hear truth,
> learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth,
> defend the truth till death.
>
>
> - Jan Hus
> _________
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Steven Shannon <stevenmarshallshannon at gmail.com>
> To: b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org
> Sent: Friday, May 16, 2008 3:51:41 PM
> Subject: [B-Greek] Episunagoge
>
> It seems that Hebrews 10:25 is referring to the coming of the Lord,  
> the day
> when we are gathered together with Him, rather than referring to the
> responsibility we have in attending church as evidenced by the fact  
> that the
> Greek feminine noun episunagoge appears as a singular noun in the  
> accusative
> case 'episunagogen', and therefore in agreement with the Greek  
> feminine noun
> hemera which also appears as singular noun in the accusative case  
> 'hemeran'.
>
> The only time episunagoge occurs elsewhere in the New Testament is  
> in 2
> Thessalonians 2:1 where it is used in regard to our being gathered  
> together
> with Christ at His coming.
> ---
> B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
> B-Greek mailing list
> B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek
>
>
>
>
> ---
> B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
> B-Greek mailing list
> B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek

—
Albert Pietersma PhD
21 Cross Street,
Weston ON Canada M9N 2B8
Email: albert.pietersma at sympatico.ca
Homepage: http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~pietersm


      


More information about the B-Greek mailing list