[B-Greek] Point of Antithesis in Language Teaching Methodologies

Randall Buth randallbuth at gmail.com
Sat May 10 02:52:06 EDT 2008


IWANH XAIREIN
I much appreciated the longer response though will limit this response to
one main point here:

>  Different people learn in different ways - there are some poeple who do
> internalise even during a grammar-translation approach. The nails where put
> in the grammar-translation method for modern language teaching many years
> ago. There are different challenges for teaching/learning a second language
> where the student is in the target language community and  teaching learning
> a foreign language where the student is living in his mother tongue language
> community.If ones aim is Koine fleuncy then the same solutions will work,
> the question for many then is what is the way to New Testament fluency when
> there is not the time to achieve Koine fluency.

do people really internalize thru GrTr (grammar translation)? Or do some people
do other things while in a GrTr program that leads them to different levels and
achievements? One of the items in SLA research is to make sure that the
things being tested are the same. E.g. two classes can use the same German
textbook, one teacher runs the class in German, one in English. They are not
the same in terms of method and the class being taught in German is mixing
in lots of communcative language teaching even if within the veneer of GrTr.
Let's look from a different angle.

Take 100 proverbial NT Greek teachers. Assume 20 years exposure as student
and teacher. How many of the hundred would be able to communicate with
each other about what they did the week before or want to do in the week
ahead? Two? Ten? (It partially depends on how much time people have on
their hands between interchanges. Are pen and scratchpad allowed? It
certainly would not look, sound, or feel like two German literature teachers
speaking with each other. Or two rabbis discussing the parasha.)
How many could listen to a colleague read from Paul (or better
Epictetus or Josephus, since it might be new, unknown material) and be
able to discuss it in the same language? Five? Notice that I don't ask 'one',
because its harder to evaluate a dialogue among one. If you find two, then
we ask what they did to get to that level and we will find that it was
something other than GrTr.

My experience is that NTGreek pedagogy as practiced is
truly GrTr and does not meaningfully move toward internalization.
Teachers and students remain monolingual in John Schwandt's terms.
Forever, as far as KOINH is concerned.
A Latin teacher in the 1870's spent a year in Germany but did all of his
German learning according to his classical methods. After all, he
was a professional and he knew about learning a langue. After a year
Francois Gouin concluded that he had utterly failed at German and
went off to discover what evoled into the Berlitz method and what is
rediscovered in various mixes by every successful language program
and method. 1. You need vast amounts of meaningful, comprehensible
input. 2. You must use a language in order to learn a language.

ENIOI KA'GW ESMEN EN b-greek PENTE H DEKA ETWN, KAI O
XRONOS OUK AYKSANEI THN ENDOTERW DYNAMIN OTI OYK
ESTIN XRHSIS KAI OYK EN TH GLWSSH ALL'  A'LLH TINI'.
O KATALOGOS TWN EPISTOLWN ESTIN KALOS
ALL' OYK AGEI EIS XRHSIN POLLHN EN TAIS SXOLAIS
H EIS DYNAMIN TWN SYZHTHSEWN KAI DIALOGWN.
NAI BOYLOIMHN ALLAKSAI TOYTO.

ERRWSO
IWANHS

-- 
Randall Buth, PhD
www.biblicalulpan.org
randallbuth at gmail.com
Biblical Language Center
Learn Easier - Progress Further - Remember for Life



More information about the B-Greek mailing list