[B-Greek] Dative participial clauses

Carl W.Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Thu Jul 5 10:57:34 EDT 2007


On Jul 5, 2007, at 7:52 AM, Carl W. Conrad wrote:

>
> On Jul 4, 2007, at 7:15 PM, Elizabeth Kline wrote:
>
>>
>> Carl Wrote
>>
>>> ... you seemed to be arguing that the dative participles
>>> and nominals  of those clauses were independent syntactically from
>>> the main clause; my observation that they more likely ARE linked
>>> syntactically with main-clause verbs taking dative complements was
>>> intended to counter that claim of syntactic detachment.
>>
>>
>>> I really think that this matter deserves a fuller
>>> investigation beyond the Biblical corpus into Hellenistic prose --
>>> and I think that such a study ought also to take into account older
>>> Classical Greek usage as well as Classical Latin prose usage, which
>>> may very well have influenced those NT writers who had some
>>> schooling.
>>
>> Two samples of pre-verbal dative participles from Thucydides which
>> appear to be syntactically independent of the following clause:
>
> Nice dredging; so here's the initial Classical Greek evidence for
> dative participial clauses. What is this, a TLG search?

I welcome Classical Attic evidence, but where I'd really like to see  
some parallel constructions in extra-Biblical literature is in Lucian  
or Pseudo-Lucian (Asinus, De Dea Syria), or Plutarch, or in  
Hellenistic Jewish "literary" writers such as  Josephus and Philo. I  
have these texts ready to hand, but not the tools to do searches.

Carl

> Preliminary unscientific foreword: Classical author Thucydides
> certainly is; prototypical he is anything but. On the other hand,
> these are from narrative rather than from speeches, and these texts
> are themselves readily intelligible enough. At first glance these
> participial clauses do indeed appear to be syntactically independent
> from what follows.
>
>> Th. 4.120.1-2
>> 	Περὶ δὲ τὰς ἡμέρας ταύτας αἷς
>> ἐπήρχοντο Σκιώνη ἐν 2 τῇ Παλλήνῃ
>> πόλις ἀπέστη ἀπ’ Ἀθηναίων πρὸς
>> Βρασίδαν. 3 φασὶ δὲ οἱ Σκιωναῖοι
>> Πελληνῆς μὲν εἶναι ἐκ  
>> Πελοποννήσου,
>> 4 πλέοντας δ’ ἀπὸ Τροίας σφῶν τοὺς
>> πρώτους κατενεχθῆναι 5 ἐς τὸ χωρίον
>> τοῦτο τῷ χειμῶνι ᾧ ἐχρήσαντο
>> Ἀχαιοί, καὶ αὐτοῦ οἰκῆσαι.
>> ἀποστᾶσι δ’ αὐτοῖς ὁ Βρασίδας
>> διέπλευσε 2 νυκτὸς ἐς τὴν Σκιώνην ...
>>
>> TH. 4.120.1-2
>> 	PERI DE TAS hHMERAS TAUTAS hAIS EPHRCONTO SKIWNH EN 2 THi PALLHNHi
>> POLIS APESTH AP' AQHNAIWN PROS BRASIDAN. 3 FASI DE hOI SKIWNAIOI
>> PELLHNHS MEN EINAI EK PELOPONNHSOU, 4 PLEONTAS D' APO TROIAS SFWN
>> TOUS PRWTOUS KATENECQHNAI 5 ES TO CWRION TOUTO TWi CEIMWNI hWi
>> ECRHSANTO ACAIOI, KAI AUTOU OIKHSAI. APOSTASI D' AUTOIS hO BRASIDAS
>> DIEPLEUSE 2 NUKTOS ES THN SKIWNHN ...
>>
>> Note in Th. 4.120.2
>> ἀποστᾶσι δ’ αὐτοῖς
>> APOSTASI D' AUTOIS
>
> We have here an account of a revolt of the Athenian tributary city
> Scione from Athenian imperial rule toward Brasidas, the Spartan
> general who was campaigning in the Thracian-northern Aegean area in
> the early years of the Peloponnesian War. While APOSTASI D' AUTOIS
> might be viewed as independent, I think it might also be understood
> as an instance of "Dative of advantage or disadvantage" (Smyth
> §1461). "To assist them (the Scioneans) in their revolt, Brasidas
> sailed directly toward Scione ... "
>
>> Th. 8.24.6
>> εἰργομένοις οὖν αὐτοῖς τῆς
>> θαλάσσης καὶ κατὰ γῆν
>> πορθουμένοις ἐνεχείρησάν τινες
>> πρὸς Ἀθηναίους ἀγαγεῖν τὴν πόλιν·
>>
>> Th. 8.24.6
>> EIRGOMENOIS OUN AUTOIS THS QALASSHS KAI KATA GHN PORQOUMENOIS
>> ENECEIRHSAN TINES PROS AQHNAIOUS AGAGEIN THN POLIN:
>>
>> Here we see two dative participle clauses prior to the main verb.
>> EGCEIREW can take a dative argument but in this passage it construes
>> with the infinitive AGAGEIN.
>
> This again might be a Dative of advantage or a Dative of reference.
> TINES must refer to Chian citizens undertaking this action of
> stirring up revolt of the city to the Athenians following significant
> losses in battle to Athenian troops on the island. "Since they (the
> Chians) were hemmed-in by sea and under siege on land, some (of the
> Chians) endeavored to bring the city over to the Athenians ... " That
> is, these citizens trying to bring about the revolt were trying to
> help out their beleaguered fellow-citizens.
>
> While the main clauses do not contain verbs that must construe with a
> dative complement, an argument might yet be made that these datives
> work syntactically with the main clause(s). On the other hand,
> there's certainly no question that both of these dative participial
> clauses function much as do "Genitive absolutes" or genitive
> participial clauses, and one might say that both are temporal: "when
> they had revolted" and "while they were hemmed-in and under siege."
>
>
> Carl W. Conrad
> Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243
> cwconrad2 at mac.com
> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/
>
>
> ---
> B-Greek home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek
> B-Greek mailing list
> B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek




More information about the B-Greek mailing list