[B-Greek] Rev. 8:9--what died?

Henry T. Carmichael carmih at bigfoot.com
Tue Nov 14 17:35:36 EST 2006


>Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2006 08:45:56 +0100
>From: "Iver Larsen" <iver_larsen at sil.org>
>Subject: Re: [B-Greek] Rev. 8:9--what died?
>To: "B-Greek B-Greek" <b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org>
>Message-ID: <003301c707c1$0af8ab60$0b51083e at IverAcer>
>Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
>	reply-type=original
>
>It would be helpful to add a bit of context:
>
>KAI EGENETO TO TRITON THS QALASSHS hAIMA,
> KAI APEQANEN TO TRITON TWN KTISMATWN TWN EN THi QALASSHi, TA ECONTA YUCAS, KAI TO TRITON TWN PLOIWN
>DIEFQARHSAN
>
>When one third of the sea was turned into blood, it is natural to assume that all the living
>creatures in that third part of the sea would die. I would understand an implied TOUT' ESTIN before
>TA ECONTA YUCAS, the things having life/soul. It relates to the creatures - TA KTISMATA - but in a
>loose sense. I see no reason to restrict the application to the air-breathing animals in the sea,
>but rather all living beings.
>That a third of the ships were destroyed must be caused by some other implied disturbance in the
>water that would destroy the ships rather than the marine life.
>
>It may be of interest to compare with Rev 16:3:
>
>KAI hO DEUTEROS EXECEEN THN FIALHN AUTOU EIS THN QALASSAN, KAI EGENETO hAIMA hWS NEKROU, KAI PASA
>YUCH ZWHS APEQANEN, TA EN THi QALASSHi.
>
>And the second (angel) poured out (the contents) of his bowl into the sea, and it became blood like
>of a dead (person), and every "soul" of life died, the things (living beings) in the sea.
>
>To complete the sense of TA we could either supply the general word "thing" or in this context we
>could suggest ZWiA - a word that is particularly common in Rev (6 out of 8 occurrences in the NT are
>in Rev.) It refers back to PASA YUCH ZWHS, but it does not agree with it in gender.
>
>Iver Larsen

I looked in Richmond Lattimore's translation, and he has the following:

"...a third of the sea was turned to blood, and there died a third of the creatures of the sea,
those which were alive, and a third of the boats were destroyed."

That favors Iver's suggestion that it refers to all living beings.

Henry Carmichael




More information about the B-Greek mailing list