[B-Greek] KURIOS hO QEOS hO PANTOKRATWR (Rev. 4:8)

George F Somsel gfsomsel at yahoo.com
Wed Nov 8 00:50:45 EST 2006


To consider this let us take a look at a couple of passages.  First, from the LXX

1 Kg 18.39

καὶ ἔπεσεν πᾶς ὁ λαὸς ἐπὶ πρόσωπον αὐτῶν καὶ εἶπον Ἀληθῶς κύριός ἐστιν ὁ θεός, αὐτὸς ὁ θεός 
KAI EPESEN PAS hO LAOS EPI PROWPON AUTWN KAI EIPON, "ALHQWS *** KURIOS ESTIN hO QEOS ***, AUTOS hO QEOS

Jn 1.1 (And please don't go there)

Ἐν ἀρχῇ ἦν ὁ λόγος, καὶ ὁ λόγος ἦν πρὸς τὸν θεόν, καὶ θεὸς ἦν ὁ λόγος. 
EN ARXHi HN hO LOGOS, KAI hO LOGOS HN PROS TON QEON,KAI *** QEOS HN hO LOGOS ***

In both of these there is a copulative verb (and in others I have surveyed as well).  Also, note how you are using "All-Powerful" here.  You are using it as a substantivized adjective in apposition to "God."  It seems rather more likely that with the absence of a copulative verb both hO QEOS and hO PANTOKRATWR would be taken as appositives rather than one as an appositive and the other as a predicate nominative.  

H.B. Swete wrote in regard to PANTOKRATWR in Re 1.8 

hO PANTOKRATWR, which in other books of the N.T. is found but once and then in a quotation (2 Cor. 6:18), occurs again in Apoc. 4:8, 11:17, 15:3, 16:7, 16:14, 19:6, 19:15, 21:22. Like K. hO QEOS, hO PATOKRATWR is from the O.T., where the LXX. use it for $aD.aY in Job and in the other books for C:Bf)oWT. K hO QEOS hO P. occurs in Hos. 12:5 (6), and in Amos passim; in 2, 3 Macc. hO P. often stands alone.hO PANTOKRATWR=hO PANTWN KRATWN, hO PANTWN ECOUSIAZWN (Cyril. Hier. catech. 8:3), the All-Ruler rather than the Almighty (hO PANTODUNAMOS, Sap. 7:23, 11:17, 18:15); see Suicer ad v., and Kattenbusch, Das apost. Symbol, 2. p. 533 f. 

The apocalypse of St. John. 1907 (H. B. Swete, Ed.) (2d. ed.) (11). New York: The Macmillan company.

 
george
gfsomsel
_________



----- Original Message ----
From: Webb <webb at selftest.net>
To: b-greek at lists.ibiblio.org
Sent: Tuesday, November 7, 2006 2:17:40 PM
Subject: [B-Greek] KURIOS hO QEOS hO PANTOKRATWR (Rev. 4:8)


If we assume that hAGIOS hAGIOS hAGIOS consists of three grammatically
independent shouts of acclamation, can somebody give me a reason strictly on
the basis of Greek grammar (not from LXX or MT of Isa. 6) why the following
phrase, KURIOS hO QEOS hO PANTOKRATWR, wouldn't look to a Greek speaker like




"God the All-Powerful is Lord!"



Webb Mealy



---
B-Greek home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/bgreek
B-Greek mailing list
B-Greek at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/b-greek




More information about the B-Greek mailing list