[B-Greek] Phil 3:13 causal ptc

Mike Sangrey MSangrey at BlueFeltHat.org
Wed Mar 1 08:41:34 EST 2006


On Wed, 2006-03-01 at 06:06 -0500, Carl W. Conrad wrote:
> On Feb 28, 2006, at 8:30 PM, Mitch Larramore wrote:
> 
> > ADELFOI, EGW EMAUTON OU LOGIZOMAI KATEILHFENAI. hEN
> > DE, TA MEN OPISW EPILANQANOMENOS TOIS DE EMPROSQEN
> > EPEKTEINOMENOS, KATA SKOPON DIWKW EIS TO BRABEION
> THS ANW KLHSEWS TOU QEOU EN CRISTWi IHSOU.
<snip>
> 
> Inasmuch as both participles, EPILANQANOMENOS and EPEKTEINOMENOS, are  
> present tense and are, as you note, coordinated with the MEN ... DE  
> markers of parallelism/antithesis, I think both should function the  
> same way in relationship to the main verb DIWKW. I really think both  
> these participles point to attitudes taken while the athlete is "in  
> the chase." Seems to me it's almost as if he's saying, "Whenever I'm  
> on course for the prize of the upward call, I forget what's behind me  
> and press toward what's before me ..." Perhaps the discourse analysts  
> have a principle regarding this, but I've noticed that the real  
> emphasis of a statement is sometimes in the participle rather than in  
> the main verb.

I've noticed this type of thing (emphasis NOT in main clause), too.  I
might be wrong, but I believe what causes it has to do with the various
ways cohesion can be created in a written text.

We (mistakenly, I think) believe that the main point of a text moves
along based on, and is even determined by, the head noun and main verb.
It appears to me that the coherency relations (whatever they might be)
that form in the mind when one reads are actually more important to
determine emphasis and even topic-comment than the syntactic structures
used.  At the very least, it seems to me we can say that the coherency
relations can override the syntactic structures.

I think this is more readily seen (heard, actually) in speech where the
tone and decibel level of the words will show the actual emphasis.
You'll notice that the emphasis is not always main noun and main verb.
For example, comedians use this so the comedic point occurs at the right
place.

We have syntax diagramming.  What we need is coherency diagramming.  My
gut, if you will, tells me these two working together would be very
powerful in exegesis.

-- 
Mike Sangrey                               (msangrey AT BlueFeltHat.org)
Exegetitor.blogspot.com
Landisburg, Pa.
                        "The first one last wins."
            "A net of highly cohesive details reveals the truth."




More information about the B-Greek mailing list