AMNOS and ARNION

waldo slusher waldoslusher at yahoo.com
Tue Jan 14 10:36:36 EST 2003


On occasion, I see RESPONSES to a post, but not the
original post. Are others experiencing that? If not,
maybe I have some setting issues to be addressed at my
end.

--- Barry Hofstetter <nebarry at earthlink.net> wrote:
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Pere Porta Roca" <pporta at tinet.fut.es>
> To: "Biblical Greek" <b-greek at franklin.oit.unc.edu>
> Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2003 12:58 AM
> Subject: [b-greek] RE: [b-Greek] EPHESIANS 1.4,5
> 
> 
> > I'm seeking for the true difference, if any,
> between the term 'AMNOS', lamb,
> > (John 1:29) and ARNION (Revelation in general,
> anywhere, for example 5:12,
> > etc.).
> > Is perhaps O AMNOS a different animal from TO
> ARNION?
> > I've not looked at any biblical Dictionary nor
> know I whether such a
> > Dictionary speaks about this. Perhaps if I look at
> such a work I'll get the
> > answer which I'm seeking for?
> 
> The two terms are practically synonyms.  AMNOS
> appears strictly to be a lamb;
> ARNION can mean either an adult sheep or a lamb, and
> though originally a
> diminutive of ARHN, it seems to have lost the force
> of a diminutive by NT times.
> 
> > I'm asking myself: If John is the author of both
> the Evangile and the
> > Revelation is it not a little striking he doesn't
> use in both books the same
> > term to show or to point to the same animal?
> 
> This gets us into areas beyond the scope of b-greek,
> but I would say it's no
> more striking than my saying "car" in one context,
> and "automobile" in another.
> I happen to think the style of Revelation is
> deliberately affected, but it would
> take a great deal of time and effort to prove
> that...
> 
> > Perhaps is an ARNION a horned and a more
> developped or grown AMNOS?
> > Or, if you prefer, is perhaps an AMNOS the same
> thing (animal now) as an
> > ARNION but one calls AMNOS the animal when it is
> in the first months of its
> > life, that's to say: AMNOS = young/baby ARNION?
> 
> I think the point of the vocabulary group is to call
> attention to sacrificial
> imagery.
> 
> > May we say that in John 1:29 it is not John the
> evangelist who is speaking
> > but John the Baptist is speaking so that who uses
> the word AMNOS is not John
> > (the writer)?
> 
> Since John the B. almost certainly made his comment
> in Aramaic, I think we have
> to say that it is still John the Evangelist who has
> chosen that Greek word for
> that specific context.
> 
> > I'm from the South Europa area and I've seen that
> generally speaking the
> > Bible translations to romanic languages --such as
> Spanish, Catalan, French,
> > Italian and so on--  give of both terms the same
> translation word: sp.
> > cordero; cat. anyell; fr. agneau, etc.
> 
> The same in the English translations.
> 
> > Is it done wrong, in the present case, to
> translate these two differents
> > terms into the same word? So should AMNOS be
> translated into one word and
> > ARNION should be translated into another word (if
> these two different and
> > specific words exist in the target language, of
> course)?
> 
> Probably not -- one would require two different
> words with almost the
> practically the identical range of meaning in the
> receptor language as in the
> original, and that's tough to get.  Contextually,
> and considering the OT
> background for the imagery, "lamb" seems to work
> just fine.
> 
> > (Please be not struck by my use of English
> prepositions: as I said I am not
> > from the English or anglophone area)
> 
> Honestly, I hardly noticed...
> 
> N.E. Barry Hofstetter
> 
> Fecisti nos ad te et inquietum est cor nostrum,
> donec requiescat in te...
>     -- Augustine, Confessions 1:1
> 
> http://home.earthlink.net/~nebarry
> 
> 
> ---
> B-Greek home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/bgreek
> You are currently subscribed to b-greek as:
> [waldoslusher at yahoo.com]
> To unsubscribe, forward this message to
> $subst('Email.Unsub')
> To subscribe, send a message to
> subscribe-b-greek at franklin.oit.unc.edu
> 
> 


=====
Waldo Slusher
Calgary, AL

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
http://mailplus.yahoo.com



More information about the B-Greek mailing list