The Proleptic Aorist revisited

Alan B. Thomas a_b_thomas at yahoo.com
Thu May 30 22:26:09 EDT 2002


Mark Wilson

I think you have produced both valid and challenging
comments with your observations. I have nothing
substantial to add, but thought it might be of some
use to make a few comments myself.

> John 13:31
> 
> LEGEI IHSOUS NUN EDOXASQH hO hUIOS TOU ANQRWPOU
> KAI hO QEOS EDOXASQH EN AUTWi
> 
> 
> Possible DC: Judas’ exit from the room.

I really question whether or not this should be
included as a proleptic aorist. There need not be any
future referred to here. The adverb NUN with an aorist
verb is noteworthy, but one can only argue for a
future event on other than grammatical grounds.

I believe the "future" aorist is very rare, for those
who see them at all, but I have always considered them
idioms, much as Wallace's gloss of the Romans 8
passage suggests. For example...

Jude 14
> 
> Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied also
> regarding
> them, when he said: "Look the Lord will come
> (AORIST) with his holy
> myriads".

The lord's return is being presented here as a
certainty. At least this is how I take what appears to
me to be a idiom.

I would unpack this idiom as .....

Look! the Lord will certainly come.... and when he
does...he will...


=====
Sincerely,
Alan B. Thomas

Unless God provides indisputable, verifiable evidence 
      of His revelation to mankind,
    it must be rejected at all costs....
  ("I did nothing in secret" Jesus Christ)

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! - Official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup
http://fifaworldcup.yahoo.com



More information about the B-Greek mailing list