CAIREIN in 2 John 10

Manolis Nikolaou aei_didaskomenos at hotmail.com
Tue May 21 18:54:38 EDT 2002


> At 9:05 AM -0500 5/21/02, boyd at huxcomm.net wrote:
> >Dear B-Greekers,
> >
> >I was wondering if CAIREIN in 2 John 10 could be understood as
> >direct discourse, rather than indirect.  Or am I misunderstanding
> >something here?  If it were indirect discourse, what would the direct
> >discourse have been?
> >
> >2 John 10
> >EI TIS ERCETAI PROS hUMAS KAI TAUTHN THN DIDACHN OU
> >FEREI, MH LAMBANETE AUTON EIS OIKIAN KAI CAIREIN
> >AUTWi MH LEGETE.
> 
> Here, as not infrequently, LEGETE is equivalent to KELEUETE (as when in
> English we use "tell" in the sense of "command"). Since CAIRE/CAIRETE is an
> imperative in the sense "be happy", the sense of the last compound clause
> in the verse is, I think, "... don't welcome him into (your) house and
> don't tell him to 'be happy', i.e. don't greet him." I think then that
> CAIREIN here is simply a complementary infinitive with MH LEGETE AUTWi.
> -- 
> 
> Carl W. Conrad
> Department of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)
> Most months:: 1647 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243
> cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu OR cwconrad at ioa.com
> WWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/


While CAIRE / CAIRETE has been a typical Greek greeting until nowadays, in
classical and Hellenistic Greek the infinitive CAIREIN  was also a very
common way to greet someone, especially in letters: Acts 15:23, Acts
23:26, James 1:1.

Although a verb like KELEUW or LEGW could be considered implied in such
cases, CAIREIN seem to have become semantically "autonomous", the way the
infinitives of some other verbs (DOKEIN, EIPEIN, DEIN etc) have also
become. So I wonder whether CAIREIN in 2 John 10 could also be understood
as a semantically autonomous infinitive:

"CAIREIN" MH LEGETE AUTWi = Don't say "CAIREIN" to him. 

It seems possible to me. . . Any thoughts? 

Regards, 
Manolis Nikolaou
Greece
        	

 



More information about the B-Greek mailing list