iterative -SKO, -SKE

Iver Larsen iver_larsen at sil.org
Fri May 3 16:51:17 EDT 2002


> Here you will find some clear examples of an iterative sense.
>
> ECCL. 1:5 KAI ANATELLEI hO hHLIOS KAI DUNEI hO hHLIOS KAI EIS TON TOPON
> AUTOU hELKEI 1:6 ANATELLWN AUTOS EKEI POREUETAI PROS NOTON KAI KUKLOI PROS
> BORRAN KUKLOI KUKLWN POREUETAI TO PNEUMA KAI EPI KUKLOUS AUTOU
> EPISTREFEI TO
> PNEUMA 1:7 PANTES hOI CEIMARROI POREUONTAI EIS THN QALASSAN KAI hH QALASSA
> OUK ESTAI EMPIMPLAMENH EIS TOPON hOU hOI CEIMARROI POREUONTAI EKEI AUTOI
> EPISTREFOUSIN TOU POREUQHNAI
>
> greetings,
>
> Clay

Thanks, Clay. There are a lot of present tenses there. Both the Greek
present tense and the imperfect tense has an imperfective aspect,
semantically speaking.

When we worked on translating the NT into the Sabaot language which has an
iterative suffix, that suffix was used for instance in
Luke 22:63 hOI SUNECONTES AUTON ENEPAIZON AUTWi DERONTES
The soldiers were repeatedly hitting him and asking. "Who is the one hitting
you (this time)?"

A similar one is
Mark 4:37 TA KUMATA EPEBALLEN EIS TO PLOION
The waves were continually/repeatedly beating against the boat.
(There we did not use an iterative suffix in Sabaot but a reduplicated
root - simsiim - which contains the iterative idea in the reduplication.)

As far as I can see, Mark's examples are not what I would classify as
iterative. I have not checked the grammars and it is not something I have
studied in detail, but it seems fairly clear that Greek does not have an
iterative affix nor an iterative aspect as such. It is from general
semantics that I would expect iterativeness to be related to a continuous
action and therefore to an imperfective aspect (which is broader than the
imperfect tense in Greek.)

Iver Larsen




More information about the B-Greek mailing list