rough breathing

Byron & Linetta Knutson byronk at open.org
Tue Jan 29 14:06:09 EST 2002


My "INTRODUCTORY NEW TESTAMENT GREEK METHOD" by Harper & Weidner makes this
comment about "Breathings."

4. An "initial" P (rho) is generally written with the rough breathing.  When
P (rho) is doubled, in the middle of a word, the first P (rho) has the
smooth breathing, and the second the rough.

He gives as an example AR-RhHTOS  "unspeakable".

(page 390, under Orthography.  Copyright 1888 Charles Scribner's Sons, &
copyright 1916 Ella D. Harper)

A.T. Robertson also has a note worth reading on this double rho breathing
mark on page 225 (e) in his big grammar.

Byron Knutson
+++++++++++++++++++++


Subject: Re: rough breathing
From: "Decker, Rodney" <rdecker at bbc.edu>
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 15:46:51 -0500
X-Message-Number: 18

This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

------_=_NextPart_001_01C1A83C.E99E62E0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"

An analytical?! That's the old 1852 work by Wigram. I doubt that it will
serve to support an argument that this was common practice as late as 1967!
But yes, it does use a most curious set of markings on words beginning with
ARR-, some of which have *3* breathing marks and an accent. I'd never
noticed it in the analytical (but then I seldom use it), and I've never seen
it anywhere else. The pre-1968 L&S (9th ed.) did not do this, nor did the
even earlier 8th ed. (1897). Does anyone have any historical info that would
explain this odd orthography?

============================================
Rodney J. Decker, Th.D.
Associate Prof/NT, Baptist Bible Seminary
Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania, USA
<http://faculty.bbc.edu/rdecker/>
PURL: <http://purl.oclc.org/NT_Resources/>
============================================




More information about the B-Greek mailing list