future infinitive

Steven Lo Vullo doulos at merr.com
Sat Jan 26 19:06:39 EST 2002


On Friday, January 25, 2002, at 05:41  PM, Mark DelCogliano wrote:

> Here is fourth century monastic text:
>
> ...YUCHN KARTWN hUPOMONHS EMPLHSQHSESQAI PROSDOKOUSAN...
>
> Does anyone have an idea why the *future* passive infinitive 
> EMPLHSQHSESQAI
> is used? The text would be perfectly intelligibile with an aorist 
> passive
> infinitive: "...a soul that expects to be filled with the fruits of
> patience..."
>
> Any thought? Any references I could look up?

Since no one else has yet answered, I thought I would take a stab, 
though I know next to nothing about fourth century Greek. Perhaps a 
lexical consideration comes into play here? Since PROSDOKAW (await, 
expect) is by its very nature forward looking (we do not presently 
possess what is expected/awaited) a future complementary infinitive 
seems appropriate.

I did find one reference you may consult. 2 Mac 7.14 contains both 
PROSDOKAW and a future infinitive, though the infinitive is not directly 
related to PROSDOKAW as a supplement.

KAI GENOMENOS PROS TO TELEUTAN hOUTWS EFH hAIRETON METALLASSONTAS hUP' 
ANQRWPWN TAS hUPO TOU QEOU PROSDOKAN ELPIDAS PALIN ANASTHSESQAI hUP' 
AUTOU.

It looks like ANASTHSESQAI is an epexegetical infinitive modifying 
TAS ... ELPIDAS ("the promises[?] of being raised again"), which is the 
direct object of PROSDOKAN (present active infinitive). However, "the 
promises[?] of being raised again by him" are what the speaker "waits 
for/expects," and I think this fits with the explanation I offered 
above, i.e., it illustrates the forward-looking nature of PROSDOKAW.
==========

Steven Lo Vullo
Madison, WI




More information about the B-Greek mailing list