implied verbs in Rom 5.18

Paul, Doug Doug.Paul at GDC4S.Com
Tue Jan 8 10:11:33 EST 2002


Romans 8:31 is similar in that there are no verbs in:

EI hO QEOS hUPER hHMWN TIS KAQ hHMWN

______________________________________________
Doug Paul		         

doug.paul at GDC4S.com
______________________________________________


-----Original Message-----
From: Carl W. Conrad [mailto:cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2002 8:19 AM
To: Biblical Greek
Cc: Biblical Greek
Subject: [b-greek] Re: implied verbs in Rom 5.18


At 5:17 AM -0600 1/8/02, Steven Lo Vullo wrote:
>Hi all:
>
>Rom 5.18: ARA OUN hWS DI' hENOS PARAPTWMATOS EIS PANTAS ANQRWPOUS EIS
>KATAKRIMA, hOUTWS KAI DI' hENOS DIKAIWMATOS EIS PANTAS ANQRWPOUS EIS
>DIKAIWSIN ZWHS ...
>
>We have here a complex sentence with an independent clause and a
subordinate
>comparative clause. Outside of conjunctions and adverbs, we basically have
>two strings of prepositional phrases. My question is: What verb or verbs
(or
>other word(s)) are implied that make sense of the strings of prepositional
>phrases? I don't think I have run across anything quite like this before.
>The several prepositional phrases don't look like they can all make sense
>construed with only one implied verb.

Interesting! I note that NET comments on this thus:

"28tn There are no verbs in the Greek text of v. 18, forcing translators to
supply phrases like "came through one "

In fact, however, the text is not really difficult to understand. The
sentence reminds me, the more I look at it, of an algebraic equation: a:b =
x:y. My candidate would be GINETAI--or better. EGENETO.

It's just as worthy of note, I think, that these clauses don't really have
a subject either: they are constituted each of three prepositional phrases.
This is a job for Superman--or should I say, for an analytic linguist. But
going at it more intuitively than might such a one, I think I'd say these
clauses are reductions and that verbal efficacy/dynamism/force (for want of
a technical term) resides in the verbal nouns, PARAPTWMA, KATAKRIMA,
DIKAIWMA, and DIKAIWSIS, so that we may tentatively supply the implicit
verbs thus:

ARA OUN hWSPER DIOTI hEIS PAREPESEN/hHMARTEN, DIA TOUTO PANTES ANQRWPOI
KATEKRIQHSAN, hOUTWS DIOTI hEIS EDIKAIWSEN, DIA TOUTO PANTES ANQRWPOI
EDIKAIWQHSAN.

So the real driving verbal force resides, I think, within those verbal
nouns; it is the "genius" or at least the NOMOS or EQOS of Greek to
dispense with implicit copulas such as ESTI, GINETAI, KAQISTATAI, KTL.
Well, there's one way of looking at it, anyhow.
-- 

Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)
Most months: 1647 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243
cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu OR cwconrad at ioa.com
WWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/

---
B-Greek home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/bgreek
You are currently subscribed to b-greek as: [doug.paul at gd-cs.com]
To unsubscribe, forward this message to
$subst('Email.Unsub')
To subscribe, send a message to subscribe-b-greek at franklin.oit.unc.edu





More information about the B-Greek mailing list