What To Do With PNEUMATIKOS

Paul Schmehl p.l.schmehl at worldnet.att.net
Tue Oct 9 22:16:24 EDT 2001


----- Original Message -----
From: "Iver Larsen" <iver_larsen at sil.org>
To: "Biblical Greek" <b-greek at franklin.oit.unc.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, October 09, 2001 3:20 PM
Subject: [b-greek] Re: What To Do With PNEUMATIKOS
>

> Briefly, in the beginning of a discourse section, there is often a setting
> introducing time, location, participants and theme. In narratives you
> normally have both time, place and people, and usually also a theme. In
> expository text, you often have only a theme. The theme is often only
hinted
> at and the reader is expected to be patient and wait for the details to be
> explained more fully later. This is a common Hebrew literaray strategy.
>
Wouldn't this support Frank's description?
 >
> The way I look at it, the word in v. 1 PNEUMATIKWN hints at the theme to
be
> developed in the whole chapter and even to the end of chapter 14. Verses
2-3
> are somewhat of an aside.
>
Again, this seems to support what Frank is contending, doesn't it?

> Then 4-6 introduce three related topics which might all be subsumed under
> PNEUMATIKA. All of these are being developed further in v. 7 onwards. So,
I
> see 4-6 as theme statements about what is to be discussed in more detail
> later.

Ditto.

> However, Paul is responding to a specific misuse of one of the
> spiritual gifts, the tongues, and it is therefore understandable if the
main
> topic will be spiritual gifts, even if they are put into a wider setting
of
> diversity and unity as well as building up the body of Christ in love.
That
> wider setting is needed for perspective.
>
Isn't this an assumption on your part?  Verse 1 introduces a new subject.
With this you agree.  The following verses begin to develop the subsections
of that subject that Paul want's to discuss.  In verses 4 and 5, he develops
the three subsections that he wants to discuss; DIAIRESEIS XARISMATWN....KAI
DIAIRESEIS DIAKONIWN.....KAI DIAIRESEIS ENERGHMATWN...  ISTM that the
PNEUMATIKWN of verse one refers to all three subject areas, XARISMATWN,
DIAKONIWN and ENERGHMATWN, doesn't it?  With this you also apparently agree.

> The three themes are
> a. CARISMATA
> b. DIAKONIAI
> c. ENERGHMATA
>
> Paul does not discuss DIAKONIAI much in chapter 12. In this context, I
think
> he is referring to the kind of ministries we find described in Eph 4:11-12
> and Rom 12. Some of them are mentioned in 1 Cor 12:28-29: apostles,
> prophets, teachers, leadership. The common terminology for this in
> charismatic circles is "ministry gifts". Peter Wagner subsumes everything
> under "spiritual gifts" so there are different traditions for what exactly
> "spiritual gifts" are.
>
I understand the traditions.  I just don't see how the Greek supports those
traditions.
>
> What else would PNEUMATIKA refer to in 14:1 if it does not refer to
> spiritual gifts?
>
Spiritual matters, the theme of this entire section.

Paul Schmehl pauls at utdallas.edu
p.l.schmehl at worldnet.att.net
http://www.utdallas.edu/~pauls/




More information about the B-Greek mailing list