1Cor 16:3

Iver Larsen iver_larsen at sil.org
Sat Aug 25 05:41:18 EDT 2001


Excuse me for jumping in here.

What about the option of "attendant circumstance" which is BDAG A III 1 c
for DIA? They cite another instance like
2 Cor 2:4 EGRAYA hUMIN DIA POLLWN DAKRUWN

Writing with tears is quite different from writing with ink. It seems to me
that Paul wants to send these people with the money accompanied by letters
that explain where they come from and probably include the amount being sent
to avoid any temptation.

Iver Larsen

>
> Dear Carl:
> I understand that DIA means "through", but I don't understand how Paul is
> going to send people to Jerusalem "through letters".
> Sincerely,
> Dmitriy
>
> On Fri, 24 Aug 2001 19:44:15 -0400 "Carl W. Conrad"
> <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu> writes:
> > At 6:39 PM -0700 8/24/01, Dmitriy Reznik wrote:
> > >Dear friends:
> > >I have a question conserning usage of DIA in 1Cor 16:3.
> > >hOTAN DE PARAGENWMAI, hOUS EAN DOKIMASHTE, DI' EPISTOLWN, TOUTOUS
> > PEMPSW
> > >etc.
> > >"And when I arrive, whomsoever ye shall approve, them will I send
> > with
> > >letters to carry your bounty unto Jerusalem".
> > >Is it correct to translate DIA as "with"? And if not, what can it
> > mean in
> > >the text?
> >
> > Not "with", in my opinion, but rather "by means of". Louw & Nida:
> >
> > 90.8 DIA (with the genitive): a marker of the instrument by which
> > something
> > is accomplished - 'by means of, through, with.' GRAFEIN OUK
> > EBOULHQHN DIA
> > CARTOU KAI MELANOS 'I would rather not write with paper and ink' 2
> > Jn 12.
> > --
> >




More information about the B-Greek mailing list