Classical grammar to Koine grammar

Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Sun Aug 12 07:46:41 EDT 2001


At 12:19 PM +0100 8/12/01, Patrick James wrote:
>> >>SW: TI DE hWN PERI MH TAUTA (ie TA AUTA) LEGOUSIN;
>> >>         hOION PERI MANTIKHS LEGEI TI hOMHROS TE KAI
>> >>         hHSIODOS.
>
>> I would have thought this would be: "What about the subjects about which
>> they don't say the same things, e.g. Homer says something about divination
>> as does also Hesiod?"
>
>Something is clearer in English than what, since TI is unaccented. LEGEI is
>singular
>so something like "and Hesiod does too" or your rendering should be used,
>unless
>Homer and Hesiod are to be taken as one unit, despite their disagreements.

The first TI is in fact accented and interrogative (of course the second TI
in "LEGEI TI" is indefinite) in the Perseus on-line presentation of the OCT
text:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0179%3Adiv1%3DIon%3Asection%3D531b&.submit

>I admit that my translation was too hurried. I really only wanted to
>illustrate the present
>tense used of an deceased author.

I actually read Mark's question before I saw your response under
subject-heading, "Jn 1.15 MARTUREI"; I supposed the translation was Mark's.
Funny: you were trying to convey the present tense used of a deceased
author; in my version, after clarifying the TI' DE ... LEGOUSIN clause, I
was emphasizing how the LEGEI singular verb works with the linked TE KAI
plurality of subjects.

Biblical Greek also uses LEGEI not infrequently with hH GRAFH (e.g. Rom
9:17; 10:11) although it also has EIPEN with hH GRAFH (e.g. John 7:38, 42).
-- 

Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)
Most months: 1647 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243
cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu OR cwconrad at ioa.com
WWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/



More information about the B-Greek mailing list