Suggestion for learning Greek well

Trevor & Julie Peterson 06peterson at cua.edu
Sat Aug 4 12:09:44 EDT 2001


I don't see how it could hurt, but I suspect that its usefulness would vary
in direct proportion to one's familiarity with reading Greek.  Another angle
(for those who know Hebrew) would be to take a crack at creating your own
Greek translation from Hebrew and comparing with the LXX.  I bring it up not
because I've tried it, but because I've heard of it as a class exercise.  I
have no idea how well it worked, though.

Trevor Peterson
CUA/Semitics

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mike Sangrey [mailto:msangrey at BlueFeltHat.org]
> Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2001 9:56 AM
> To: Biblical Greek
> Subject: [b-greek] Suggestion for learning Greek well
>
>
>
> I haven't tried this...yet...  But it seems to me that it might
> work quite well.
>
> Pick a text (say) from the NASB or NRSV and back translate it
> into Greek.  It will very likely be different.  So, figure out
> why.
>
> Something which may work even better is to back translate from
> a more idiomatic translation as the NIV or even CEV.  This will
> be more difficult, but it will force you to think more deeply
> regarding how the Greek language works.
>
> Might I suggest that an extensive amount of "doing Greek backwards"
> will make a substantial impact on one's ability to "think Greek."
>
> Thoughts anyone?
> --
> Mike Sangrey
> msangrey at BlueFeltHat.org
> Landisburg, Pa.
>                         "The first one last wins."
>             "A net of highly cohesive details reveals the truth."
>
>
>
> ---
> B-Greek home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/bgreek
> You are currently subscribed to b-greek as: [06peterson at cua.edu]
> To unsubscribe, forward this message to
> $subst('Email.Unsub')
> To subscribe, send a message to subscribe-b-greek at franklin.oit.unc.edu
>
>




More information about the B-Greek mailing list