[permaculture] nutrition -- sprouted kamut bread

Frances and David fdnokes at hotmail.com
Sun Oct 28 15:56:36 EDT 2012


a quick note about food processing the sprouts.
we have tried different methods but recently purchased a food processor made 
by PC (Superstore). It has many excellent features and the S blade works 
great for this recipe (the fact that it is held in place really helps the 
process of unloading each batch as the whole mix is processed batch by 
batch). I have found it works best to stick to loosely loading up to 3 cups 
or less for each batch and to let it run until it becomes dough like and 
starts to bunch up and get kneaded by the S blade. This recent discovery has 
really elevated the level of our sprouted bread. It is now a nice smooth 
result that can rise and sour nicely over the hours that we leave it before 
putting it in the oven. (We left ours overnight this time and the result was 
great -- lots of even little holes throughout). Please keep in in mind that 
times and heating vary greatly for bread according to ovens and local 
climactic conditions. I've always found that fermented things do great here. 
This last bit, the souring of the bread is our last little tweak that has 
left us both thrilled and amazed.
Also, when we go on to try additions, we will be looking into adding herbs, 
onion, garlic, that sort of thing. Maybe even a seed such as caraway or 
fennel.
Also, to try out is baking on a pan. In preparation for possibly visiting 
places where a woodstove is the norm for cooking.
fran

-----Original Message----- 
From: Frances and David
Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2012 12:23 PM
To: permaculture
Subject: Re: [permaculture] nutrition -- sprouted kamut bread

Hi LL,
Dave and I are food sensitives, in fact.  As they say, culture is so much
about food.  In pursuing a path of learning what is good for me to eat, I
did not fully anticipate the extent of the shift in life this would create.
So much 'easy company' depends upon food. I've chosen otherwise, and it has
made all the difference! (allusions to Robert Frost's The Road Not Taken are
absolutely intended!)
Well, we have created a little food culture of our own together and have
friends who participate in it as well. It's sure been nice here mid
Vancouver Island where many are health conscious eaters and where tolerance
and acceptance of others' choices is the norm.
We have fond memories of Harvest Health Food Collective where we met, even
though it no longer exists. When it shut down, there was a blossoming forth
of many privately owned places including new places where we continued to
find friendship and community. I sometimes stop to realize what a quality
shopping experience I have had by virtue of my food choices. And then, the
whole question of travel with our organic, very specialized diets looked
like a problem until the solution,  wwoofing, revealed itself as a huge
plus! (We're not touristy types and most of our best memories of travel
relate to volunteering on a farm or at a retreat centre)
Meanwhile, back at the ranch, yes, you can easily use wheat, spelt, rye.
Whatever suits you best.  As to quinoa and millet... The taste might not be
what you want on its own, but if you look up some of the ingredients of the
commerical sprouted grain breads online, I think you'll note how they
combine things. Not sure, though, if they sprout the quinoa and millet or
just add them in after soaking perhaps. There may be an issue with sprouting
them -- possibly taste.  Speaking of taste, Chas in Ontario, (whose retreat
centre we volunteered at and who got us started on this), used muffin tins
and soaked goji berries to put in his sprouted kamut muffins. So, you can,
if you like, add other ingredients.  There will be more sugar to balance,
though, and for those reducing sugar, something to consider. Also, for those
considering food combining, easier to digest these things separately. It all
depends where you are on the continuum of considerations in making choices~
Do you have any particular things you want to incorporate? One thing I have
on my list to consider is amaranth as an additive. We have little to no
experience with amaranth, and would be interested to hear from anyone as to
what they like to do with theirs.
Btw, Dave and I do not eat identically in the least. I think this is
important. Intuitive eating requires that each follows their own guidance.
We use information from many different concepts, but ultimately, it's our
own sense of balance and nutrition that wins the day.
Right now, though, we have gone back to the blood type diet info/lists for
tips on which things to choose for our diets. I'm an A secretor and Dave's
an O non-secretor, and kamut sprout bread is considered beneficial for both.
(I do not agree with everything stated in the blood type diet, just find a
lot of useful information there.)  We seem to be changing up our diets at
regular intervals. Healing with Whole Foods by Paul Pitchford is an
interesting reference for tweaking the diet. Here in the Pacific NW we have
had a very sudden shift from dry warm sunny summery weather to damp, wet
cloudy rainy weather.  This would not be the time to use wheat sprouts, with
rye and their quality of heat a better choice at this time. (for example, of
one way of using the information). I believe that even a sense of a shift in
weather being a time to adjust the diet can be beneficial.
Cheers,
Frances

My most recent readings about nutrition were about how it affects dental
health. Interesting consideration. Oil soluble fats are key. ~~
Two things that can make a huge difference to health and feelings of well
being are essential fatty acids (particularly '3's) and Vitamin D (which is
something for Northern Hemisphere folks to be diligent about at this time of
waning light).

-----Original Message----- 
From: venaurafarm
Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2012 11:09 AM
To: permaculture
Subject: Re: [permaculture] nutrition -- sprouted kamut bread

On 10/28/2012 1:28 PM, Frances and David wrote:

> My husband and I met at a health food collective in Winnipeg about 30
> years ago.  Have investigated much information on food, both eating

That must have been a great start for your relationship, a good
environment, nurturing in positive directions.

> and preparation, since then. Right now, we’re excited about kamut
> sprout bread that we are making. Taking grains and soaking, then
> rinsing and letting sit in the dark for about 3 days or so until two
> sprouts are formed, is a way of altering the grain chemistry and
> nutritive content that makes it more beneficial for eating.  We take
> the sprouts and grind them down in a food processor. From there, we
> knead into loaves and let sit to ferment for several hours.
> Sourdough!  From there, we put in the oven on parchment paper at 225
> F for an hour. Then, we remove from the parchment paper and baking
> sheets and let sit on the racks of he oven with the heat off for a
> while.

This is great information and thanks. Can spelt be used this way? rye?
barley? a mix of these + kamut? what about quinoa?

For those with wheat allergy sprouting probably won't make it edible for
you and that includes making rejuvelac with the soaked sprouts.

LL

_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
message archives:  http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/
Google message archive search:
site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [searchstring]
Avant Geared  http://www.avantgeared.com

_______________________________________________
permaculture mailing list
permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
message archives:  http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/
Google message archive search:
site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [searchstring]
Avant Geared  http://www.avantgeared.com 



More information about the permaculture mailing list