kudzu

PINC pinc at svn.net
Tue Sep 12 01:49:05 EDT 2000



"> Japan has a different climate and a variety of
>uses for this plant and harvest it in large quantities.
Yes- and then they sell the value-added products to the US! Can anybody find
me a copy of "The Book of Kudzu"? I want it for the library..."


I have a reference regarding kudzu in a book on tropical plants that yield
non-seed producing carbohydrates. This book is part of a 12 volume set on
Plant Resources of South East Asia. It is only available in Asia and they
won't ship it anywhere else. I took the time to copy info on kudzu from one
of the books

"Kudzu - Pueraria lobata produces edible tubers, useful stem fiber, it's
leave shoots and flowers can be used as vegetable and for silage or hay, and
it is a useful erosion-controlling soil cover, shade plant and medicinal
plant. The tuber is esteemed for it's fine starch used especially in China,
Japan and Papua New Guinea for sauces, soups, jelled salads, noodles,
porridges, jelly puddings, confectionary and beverages. Japan produces over
300 tons per year. Elsewhere in SE Asia the tubers are used in times of
famine. The stem fibres are used for binding (ropes) weaving (clothes,
fishing line, baskets) and for paper production. It is excellent for fodder
and silage, if mixed with grass. It is effective for erosion control,
provided it's growth is controlled; it's aggressive growth may lead to
entire forests being covered and trees dying, as has been experienced in the
United States. Medicinally the starch is used in Japan to restore intestinal
and digestive disorders, taken in soups or teas. Tea from the tuber is used
in China against colds, influenza, diarrhoea, dysentery and hangovers. The
flower buds are used as a diaphoretic and febrifuge medicine. Kudzu is also
popular as an ornamental climber with fragrant flowers."
Penny


-----Original Message-----
From: rick valley [mailto:bamboogrove at cmug.com]
Sent: Monday, September 11, 2000 3:13 PM
To: permaculture
Subject: Re: native/non-native

Toby H said:
>In
>old-growth I only see invasives at road cuts. They need sun.
Most do! But Hedera helix (English Ivy) and Ilex Aquifolium(English Holly)
can penetrate intact native Oregon forest just fine. Yeah, disturbance makes
'em faster, but just normal blow-down does the job as far as that goes. And
they're bird dispersed.
and Mango Dance said about Kudzu:
> Japan has a different climate and a variety of
>uses for this plant and harvest it in large quantities.
Yes- and then they sell the value-added products to the US! Can anybody find
me a copy of "The Book of Kudzu"? I want it for the library...
The thing that makes Yellow Flag Iris such a *menace* is that the (large)
seeds float; nor is it palatable to geese and such. So it has rapidly come
to
dominate the lower Columbia R. sloughs, Lake Washington, Crystal Springs
lake
in Portland, the Clackamas R., etc. etc.
there's always an exception.
We've changed the ecology more than we can understand
Don't kill all the rabbits, they're part of the new dreaming
-Rick


Rick Valley Northern Groves
PO Box 1236, Philomath, OR 97370
Mobile-(541)602-1315, hm.& msg. (541)456-4364  Bamboo catalog $3 or at
<http://www.teleport.com/~dbrooks/bamboo.html>
"Useful Bamboos and other plants‹ Permaculture education‹ Ecological design
&
consultation centering on water,landform and horticultural systems"



---
You are currently subscribed to permaculture as: pinc at svn.net
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
$subst('Email.Unsub')
To subscribe send email to lyris at franklin.oit.unc.edu
with message text containing: subscribe permaculture




More information about the permaculture mailing list