[NAFEX] What if?

Steve sdw12986 at aol.com
Thu Apr 10 00:47:19 EDT 2008


Donna &/or Kieran wrote:
> For Steve in the Adirondacks of northern NY:
>
> I'm just thinking.... What if, someday, I decided to move. What if I
> moved from here, in zone 3B, to northern Florida? Just for the sake of
> argument, let's say the Gainesville area in zone 8B.
>
> So what about Gainesville? Too far north for  the really edible citrus
> fruits. Right?   YEP
>
> Maybe too far south for most apples. I would think any
> apples would have to be low chill varieties with pretty low quality?
> FROM MY PARENTS EXPERIENCE IN CENTRAL FLORIDA, RACCOONS WILL EAT EVERYTHING 
> YOU GROW EXCEPT LEMONS.
> Maybe there are some warm growing plums that would be good. Is it still
> in the right range for peaches? THEY DO GROW PEACHES THERE I HEAR.  I NEVER 
> SAW ANY PEACHES IN FLORIDA.  I HAVE SEEN PHOTOS OF PLUMS DEVELOPED FOR 
> GAINESBORO AREA.  I HAVE SEEN AND SOLD THE TREES, BUT HAVE NEVER MET ANYONE 
> WHO ATE FROM THE TREES.
>   How bad would the disease pressure be  with such warm humid summers?
> DREADFUL.  YOU CAN WATCH YOUR TOMATO PLANTS MELT PRACTICALLY BEFORE YOUR 
> EYES.
>
> What other fruits might do well there?  BLUEBERRIES, MUSCADINES, 
> POMEGRANATES (This is just a little fantasy I'm having as I watch the snow 
> melt around here.)
>
> I SUGGEST YOU CHANGE YOUR FANTASY:  Suppose you were somewhere in western or 
> central Virginia or NC.  You've had a little bit of snow just for old times 
> sake, lasted about 24 hours.  You've also had lots of pretty shirt sleeve 
> weather.  You can grow apples, pears, plums, cherries, and they are less 
> likely to freeze out in the spring than over here on the western side of the 
> Appalacians.  The summers are hot and humid, but they don't last 10 months 
> like Florida summers.  And best of all, there is cool weather in winter to 
> give you a few months of relief from the bugs.  Do a little research on the 
> net while you wait for the snow to melt.   We drove over the mtns late one 
> spring and upon entering the Shenandoah Valley it was apparent at once that 
> we were in a softer climate, better soil than we have here.  There were 
> beautiful lilacs in bloom, they nearly always freeze out here.  And there 
> were apple trees that were huge and covered in blossoms, not the sparse 
> blooming we typically see here.      Donna 
>
>   
You're probably right. Florida would be too much of a shock after living 
in the frozen north for over 30 years and counting. I'm sure that the 
Carolinas would be more than enough change to make me feel better.
Funny you should mention muscadines. I was just thinking about them 
moments ago. It crossed my mind that they would grow in northern Florida 
and that reminded me to come back here to see if I had any other replies.
I've never tasted a muscadine! What are they like compared to the grapes 
I do know? Sweet? They look like they might have a tough skin. Yeah, I 
know, there are lots of varieties to choose from and they are not all 
alike. Still, they must have things in common that make them obviously 
different from other grapes.

Steve in the Adirondacks (where the snow is melting fast and there are 
eagles out on the remaining lake ice every time I look out the deck 
door. 64 degrees today and I got some fruit trees pruned. The others, 
I'll have to wait. Too much snow around them.)



More information about the nafex mailing list