[NAFEX] Budagovsky 118

loneroc loneroc at mwt.net
Sun Sep 28 07:21:44 EDT 2003


Gordon,

I got my interstems from good ole Bear Creek.  They appear to have been (if my memory serves) saddle grafted.  My guess is that the rootstock, interstem and scion were 'assembled' at the same time (at least for some of the trees) based on the size and healing of the grafts.  It is possible that some scions had been put on interstems made the previous year, but the one that I studied closely seemed to have been grafted all at once.

My Honeycrisps on 118, were whip and tongued by Frank Folz of Northwind nursery and were in their 3rd leaf this past summer (first leaf was the grafting season) and don't appear to have spurs for next year.  The interstems fruited in their fourth leaf and are bearing decently at seven years.  The interstem trees have the interstem portion  buried halfway, and, although staked, appear to be self-supporting and quite strong.  I lean my trees toward the southwest at planting as a bit of protection against sunscald.  With early heavy cropping the interstems need staking at first to support the crop without excess leaning.  As the trunks catch up to the tops, they support the crops just fine.  I have had straight Bud-9 dwarfs snap off under the weight of wind and crop when I delayed good staking.  The Bud-9/scion union on the interstem has not shown weakness thus far, but perhaps others (Ed Fackler?) can tell us whether the union is stronger than straight Bud-9's

The only flaw with the interstem trees was that they needed quite a bit of work to get a dominant leader going.  Without persuasion, they wanted to form a mop rather than a nice central leader.

I fertilize the trees located in particularly thin soil with a bit of organic vegetable garden fertilizer that is a 6-4-3 (or close to that).  They are mulched in a 3-4 foot circle with shredded oak bark of chips.

The only rootsock for apples that I buy or stool these days is Bud-9.  I graft on these with a whip and toungue.  I don't have space for any more standard or semidwarf apples, but there's still room for dwarves here and there.  I've been grafting mostly apricots and plums for the last couple years--whip and tounge grafts in the spring.  I get a much lower percentage of takes on these, even with heat during callus formation, but what the heck, I'm just doing it for fun.

Steve Herje, Lone Rock, WI USDA zone 3
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Gord Hawkes 
  To: North American Fruit Explorers 
  Sent: Friday, September 26, 2003 8:05 AM
  Subject: RE: [NAFEX] Budagovsky 118


  Steve.  How early did your Bud 118-Bud 9 interstems come into bearing.  Do you do much in the way of fertilization?  Are the unions strong i.e. no staking?   What grafting process did you use for the 118/9 and the 9/cultivar?

  Very curious.

  Gord Hawkes
  Log Cabin Orchard
  Osgoode, Ontario, Canada, eh?
    -----Original Message-----
    From: nafex-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org [mailto:nafex-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org]On Behalf Of loneroc
    Sent: September 26, 2003 7:44 AM
    To: Three Hills Farm; North American Fruit Explorers
    Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Budagovsky 118


    I have grown Bud 118-bud 9 interstems for about 7 years.  Several trees on nearly pure, somewhat alkaline sand are doing very well.  They do not appear to show water stress.  The fruit on the interstems is perhaps, just a bit smaller than trees on plain Bud 9's.  The Bud-9's are on good soil, however, so the comparison  is not necessarily "apples to apples".

    I recently put in a few Honeycrisps on straight 118.  They seems a bit slow to establish the first year, but took off the second, putting on 2-3 feet of new growth.

    An interesting observation on 118 is that is a rosybloom type.  It has beautiful deep pink blooms and appears to be fairly scab resistant.  The apples are in the apple/crab range for size, ripen here in August, and are sweet with  fairly high tannin levels.  Unlike most hardy crabs that have tannins, 118  tastes like it is relatively low in acid levels.  I plan to fruit 118's to try as a source of tannin for hard ciders--something that is thus far almost non-existent in zone 3 hardy apples.

    Good luck with your plantings.  I think that 118 will prove very useful for folks who don't need much dwarfing.

    Steve Herje, Lone Lock, WI  USDA zone 3
      ----- Original Message ----- 
      From: Three Hills Farm 
      To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org 
      Sent: Thursday, September 25, 2003 12:28 AM
      Subject: [NAFEX] Budagovsky 118


      Hey folks. . .

      I'm seriously considering having a decent sized block (400 trees) of heirloom apple trees grafted onto Bud 118 this coming Spring and would like to hear firsthand what the pros and cons may be of this rootstock relatve to the other Standard sized cold-weather rootstocks like Antanovka, Baccata, Ranetka or even P18.  I realize the trees on Bud 118 are going to be big and cold hardy.  What I'm most interested in learning about is the precocity, productivity and fruit sizes of trees grafted onto this stock.   

      Here's a bit of what I've been able to Google:

      BUDAGOVSKY 118 (Bud 118)   



      "About the same vigor as MM.111, but as winter-hardy as Antonovka.  Burrknots and suckers are rare.  Productive; well-anchored."  (CUMMINS NURSERY)



      "Produces a tree 90% that of standard. The vigor of Bud 118 is particularly valuable on dry, sandy orchard sites. This understock is resistant to collar rot and apple scab, and slightly susceptible to crown gall and powdery mildew. B 118 is extremely winter hardy and is recommended for replant conditions."  (C&O NURSERY)



      "A vigorous, semi-dwarf rootstock that produces trees roughly the same size as those grown on EMLA 111 roots.  Bud 118 is from the same Russian program that created Budagovsky 9 (Bud 9).  It is extremely cold hardy, well anchored and works with most soils."   (VAN WELL NURSERY)


      Is there anybody on the list who's had trees on Bud 118 for a number of years who'd care to share of their personal experiences with this rootstock?

      Any/all feedback greatly appreciated.

      John

      * * * * *

      John A Gasbarre
      Three Hills Farm
      Union, Maine  USA
      organic at threehillsfarm.com
      http://www.threehillsfarm.com/apples.html 
      44° 15' 45" N / 69° 19' 45" W   



--------------------------------------------------------------------------


      _______________________________________________
      nafex mailing list 
      nafex at lists.ibiblio.org

      To unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be used to change other email options):
      http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex

      File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
      TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
      Please do not send binary files.
      Use plain text ONLY in emails!

      Message archives are here:
      http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex

      NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/



------------------------------------------------------------------------------


  _______________________________________________
  nafex mailing list 
  nafex at lists.ibiblio.org

  To unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be used to change other email options):
  http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex

  File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
  TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
  Please do not send binary files.
  Use plain text ONLY in emails!

  Message archives are here:
  http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex

  NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20030928/fef243e9/attachment.html 


More information about the nafex mailing list